World’s Fastest Car, Koenigsegg One:1 to Feature 3D Printed Exhaust Tips

Share this Article

Something amazing about the high performance automobile industry is that, with the help of new technologies, they are always pushing new limits. This is certainly the case for Swedish super car manufacturer, koenigsegg-featKoenigsegg, who has just unveiled the Koenigsegg One:1.  According to Koenigsegg, the One:1 is the fastest production car in world. No records have been broken yet, but in simulated tests, the company claims the vehicle reached 273 miles per hour as a top speed. If it can do this on the track, it will be the fastest production car ever produced, beating out the Hennessey Venom GT, at 270.49 mph, which broke the record themselves just a couple weeks ago.

So how did they manage to create such an amazing  machine, capable of going twice as fast as some of the top sports cars did just 50 years ago? It all comes down to one simple ratio, horsepower to weight. The reason this Koenigsegg is called the One:1 is because of that very ratio. The car’s horsepower of 1360 is equal to its weight of 1,360 kilograms. In order to get the weight down as far as they possibly could, the company had to really work hard to figure out ways to cut back in all areas of the vehicle.koenigsegg

This is where 3D printing has come into play. Koenigsegg decided to 3D print the exhaust tips of the One:1 out of titanium. In doing so, they were able to shave off about 400 grams from the total weight. Not much when you consider the car’s weight is 1,360,000 grams, but enough for the company to spend 3 days printing the part for each super car they make. To date this has been the largest known 3D printed titanium part produced anywhere in the world.

The Koenigsegg One:1 will be on display at the Geneva Motor Show next week. The company plans on only producing six of these vehicles, at a price tag of $1.5 million. Discuss the Koenigsegg One:1 at 3DPrintBoard.

Share this Article


Recent News

Air Force Awards Optomec $1M for High Volume 3D Printing Repair of Turbines

3D Printed Solid State Lithium Batteries: Safer, Less Expensive, Higher Energy Density



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

NASA Awards Contract to Build 3D Printed Batteries in Space

I was recently playing a game of Trivial Pursuit with my parents, and a question came up that I was sure my husband would know the answer to; so, in...

Quasi-Solid-State 3D Printed Battery Features Improved Stability & Density

3D printing is continually associated with the energy industry, from wind turbines to fuel cells and a variety of different casings for batteries. Now, researchers from Singapore and China are...

3D Printing: Anisotropic Polymer Nanocomposites with Aligned BaTiO3 Nanowires

Chinese and UK researchers delve into the area of composites for use in the field of energy, releasing their findings in the recently published ‘3D printing of anisotropic polymer nanocomposites...

New Research Summary of 3D Printing Materials and Methods for Batteries and Supercapacitors

Because the technology can achieve complex shapes and structures and multifunctional material systems, a trio of researchers in Ireland – Umair Gulzar, Colm Glynn, and Colm O’Dwyer – were interested...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.