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Go from Maker to Producer with Many-Maker: Desktop Plastic Injection Molding 3D Printer Accessory

INTAMSYS industrial 3d printing

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UntitledThe world of 3D printing has proven to be one centered around evolution. The hardware has been refined continuously from manufacturers and by makers themselves, offering greater speed, resolution, and a wide scope of features that are now becoming a requirement in an expanding and competitive marketplace. Options for materials has expanded so far past the use of plastic that it’s hard to keep track—from metal to wood to ceramics, and even smart intuitive textures that translate into 4D. And of course, the ultimate evolution has been that of progress by users, resulting in a cascading effect of innovations that are making impacts in nearly every sector today.

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Lafras Henning

Now, founder Lafras Henning at Many-Maker wants to see those involved in 3D printing evolve from designers to producers as they discover ‘the birth of a new type of making,’ via automated desktop plastic injection molding. This should be an attractive invitation for those wishing to produce large batches of plastic 3D printed parts—and more affordably—becoming a veritable factory at the desktop.

In essence, Many-Maker functions as a 3D printing accessory that offers both a completely unique—and comprehensive—solution for makers. Offering the tools, materials, and a way to learn new skills, the goal is for future entrepreneurs to use Many-Maker for competing in this new industrial revolution.

Lafras, a a lifelong tinkerer, maker, and ‘sometimes inventor’ from South Africa, is preparing to launch this new product on Indiegogo on February 9th with hopes to raise $25K in funding. He created Many-Maker after realizing that one of the biggest issues in 3D printing is that while indeed it’s perfect for rapid prototyping, that’s certainly not the case for producing large quantities of parts rapidly.

“…3D printing is too slow and costly for production runs, and the long lead time, high cost and risk of the injection moulding tools prevents quick and easy access to industrial injection molding processes,” states Lafras.

Many-Maker bridges the gap for makers in terms of prototyping and producing quantity. If this is something that interests you, the process is as simple as designing your part that you’d like to manufacture, print and test it, add the Many-Maker mold tool template, and 3D print your own two mold master tools. Once they are fitted to the master steel tool frame, you can inject it with molding compound. Attach your molding tool to the Many-Maker, and you are ready to get started reproducing parts—and in record time. There are three models offered:

  • Manual – retailing at $399 plus shipping for early birds backing the Indiegogo campaign – this is the bare bones model.
  • Automatic – retailing at $699 plus shipping for early birds backing the Indiegogo campaign – this is the bare bones automated model.
  • Large PRO – retailing at $1199 plus shipping for early birds backing the Indiegogo campaign – this is the fully automated desktop model

UntitledAn optional color mixing screw attachment is available also, allowing you to mix any color or use color master-batches to achieve an unlimited uniform color range.

Additional benefits of using Many-Maker include:

  • Convenience and automation
  • Speed
  • Time to Market
  • Strength in products
  • Affordability

“Many-Maker is not a consumer product, it is a machine I build for other makers like me, wanting to learn new skills and expand on their capabilities,” states Lafras. “If you want an appliance that going to “cook” your 3D prints for you the first time out the box, then Many-maker is not  for you. You will have many failed attempts at producing your own injection moulding parts before you start winning, but once you win you will have a valuable new tool and skill set.”

“If you are a maker, inventor, or entrepreneur–no matter what your current project—you need to start exploring and exploiting desktop injection molding technology,” says Lafras.

This goal of this product is to see that you maximize your talents as a maker, along with helping Lafras in his mission to take ‘the democratized manufacturing movement to the next level.’ The impending Indiegogo campaign, to be launched February 9th, will help Lafras to raise enough funds to buy pricey testing equipment, as well as for ordering parts in bulk—with the ultimate goal of beginning to ship his first full production batch in July. Is this something you need? Discuss in the Many-Maker 3D Printing Accessory forum over at 3DPB.com.

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