Materialise Releases Magics20 Software as New, True Backbone for 3D Printing Industry

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logo (1)Belgium-based Materialise is a powerhouse of 3D printing innovation. When hearing about a diagnosis or surgery aided miraculously by 3D printed medical models that help to save lives or new partnerships in developing 3D printed implants, you can often assume Materialise is a crucial element behind the scenes. Their specialized teams are the ones who generally get the first call for help in making intricate 3D models for crucial projects and surgeries that have most likely never been attempted before.

With the latest release of Magics20  the dynamic manufacturer and innovator is now offering users an even easier way to close that gap between 3D printing systems and important applications. The new release offers a new user interface and supports all current file formats, to include voxels and .3MF.guys

“When I purchased my first stereolithography machine and started Materialise 25 years ago, the industry lacked the software needed to efficiently connect a design to a 3D printer. In order to survive and thrive as a company, we needed to develop a solution that allowed us to meet customer demand for 3D printed prototypes, on time and as ordered,” said Materialise founder and CEO Fried Vancraen.

“The resulting software worked so well that we brought it to the market as Magics. Over the years, Magics has helped lift the AM industry as a whole to new levels by optimizing data and build preparation for an expanding range of materials and technologies.”

This most recent offering of their data and build preparations software also allows for better, more efficient 3D printing and they state that for metal 3D printing, users will find it has never been easier, especially in combination with their enterprise software solution (Streamics), a range of Build Processors, an additive manufacturing control platform (AMCP), and more.

“Now, 25 years later, we face new challenges as our customers increasingly request 3D-printed, end-use parts that meet the demanding standards of their industries – and it is a challenge we have proven able to meet,” said Vancraen. “And once again, Materialise is ready to raise the AM industry as a whole to new heights by granting access to a software backbone that enables certified manufacturing: Magics20.”

20Users will enjoy:

  • The modern, intuitive interface
  • Superior geometrically correct fixing
  • Excellence in being able to repair textures and colors
  • High-precision marking tools
  • Efficient build platform tools
  • Focuses on quality control with elaborate measurements and reports

Several modules have also been upgraded, allowing for much more efficient and improved nesting, along with more flexibility and better workflow.

Busy this week in Frankfurt, Germany at the formnext show, powered by TCT, the Materialise team is showing off exactly what Magics20 can do, with projects and demonstrations featuring a wide and versatile range of partners from Toyota to Adidas, and many others in between.

Materialise has also announced that their certified factory for 3D printing is now manufacturing end use plastic parts for the Airbus’s A350 XWB, as we reported just recently. This is significant as they are expanding their reach into the aerospace industry after obtaining EN9100 and EASA 21G certifications. The Airbus’ A350 XWB is a new, fuel-efficient jetliner that currently has over 1,000 3D printed parts. While previously Stratasys was producing the components, now Materialise will be manufacturing them as as well.

A veteran in the 3D printing industry, Materialise has been contributing invaluable innovations for industrial and medical applications since 1990–long before most of us even that the technology existed. With branches all over the world, they continue to play a very important role in developing new products and solutions for demanding, contemporary standards in industry. Discuss this latest software in the Magics20 Forum Thread on 3DPB.com.

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