New, Faster Fabcore Released as ‘The Future of 3D Printing,’ Open Source Files Now on Thingiverse

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UntitledWhile it is now completely believable that you can find an extraordinarily inexpensive 3D printer these days, many users still have considerable trepidation, which can go either way depending on their requirements. Some want to be able to control, modify, improve, while others worry about receiving a box full of pieces, instructions for different scraps of unwieldy code and modifications to download–and they worry that they need the sky-high IQ of an eccentric hacker to be able to put it all together, maintain it, and troubleshoot. And once it’s all been put together, what does it look like?

UntitledWhether offering a turnkey solution or a kit, the 3D printer of today must be streamlined and quite simply, must have it all–and then some. It must look sophisticated, offering clean elegant lines and style. For those who want to tinker, the machine should be complex enough to allow them to keep modifying and building. It must be full of features that offer a spacious build size, speed, and quality.

It’s certainly no small feat to please everyone these days, but we’ve found that most often the best designs do come from makers who in the beginning were working to fulfill their own requirements in making–as is the case of the Fabrap 3D printer, which we’ve been following through numerous iterations.

Even if you don’t ever use it, these 3D printers are easy on the eyes in the previous elegant red and black, with the newest, the Fabcore, in yellow. The Fabrap lineup is aesthetically pleasing, chock full of features, and it also appeals to the maker/hacker crowd with its RepRap origins and continuing open-source concept, which allows you–if you are so inclined–to put this machine together yourself and save scads more money.

From the original to the 3.2–and now the Fabcore–we’ve been following the four brothers behind the innovative company–three of whom live on a small French island called Réunion, and one in Belgium. The sibling team is constantly making improvements to their Fabrap design. Originally, as they began working with the RepRap design, they discovered there were numerous other customizations they needed, beginning with a larger build plate–and the Fabrap was born.

fabrapWhile users have been enjoying the Fabrap 3.2 most recently with the continued simple and functional design, the team of brothers are now offering what they see as the true future of the 3D printer with the Fabcore. It offers even greater speed, rigidity, and the added enclosure allows users to 3D print with ABS more effectively, and easily. All the files have been released on Thingiverse, and users can build this machine as well as helping the team to improve the new 3D printer which offers a double resolution z axis driven with an open GT2 belt.

Other specs:fabrap exploded view

  • 200 x, 200 y, z 200
  • Drive core in x and y axis
  • Stl joined
  • Step version available at Fabrap
  • Extruder GT2
  • Hotend 0.4mm, 1.75 pla
  • Box for subsequent transition to abs

The mission with all of the Fabrap 3D printers is to keep improving–and for the users to keep enjoying the technology of the future. All Fabrap machines come with resources for purchases, as well as video tutorials.

Let us know your thoughts on this machine in the FabRap forum thread on 3DPB.com

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