Glaston Corporation’s 3D Printed Glass Featured at Milan’s Vitrum Fair This Week

Share this Article

Glaston_steel_bigI frequently admit to readers that I have grown rather obsessed with 3D printing materials. What you print with, in my estimate, is as important as what you print. I think this sentiment derives largely from my interest in an ecologically sustainable 3D printing industry that includes biodegradable and recyclable materials. This article couldn’t come at a better time, because we really don’t hear as much about the 3D printing of glass, do we? Shapeways first announced its offering of 3D printing with glass in April 2010. And it also offered glass design rules (that includes all walls have to be 3 mm) that automatically exclude many designs from being printed in glass.

When I think about 3D printing glass I get very excited. 90% of the earth’s crust is silicate minerals, and glass is easy to recycle, it’s cheap, and and it looks and feels great too. Obviously, it’s not for everything. In fact, one of 3D printing’s big emphases is on durability and strength of printed objects, not fragility. But for those who are interested in the process of making glass stronger for industry and personal purposes, you can see the evolution of glass in the 3D printing space for yourself. From October 6 – 9, the international glass industry hosts Vitrum, a fair taking place in Milan, Italy where Finland’s Glaston Corporation plans to exhibit its latest developments and explorations of “the future of glass tempering.”

FC1000-horno-glaston

Before we dive into the topic of glass, we need to know more about Glaston Corporation. According to its website, Glaston delivers technologies and services to manufacture “the world’s best heat-treated glass” for use in  architectural, appliance, solar, and automotive applications. Now, as any industry-leading company would do, Glaston has its sights on more 3D printed glass and tempering possibilities.

Arto Metsänen, CEO and President of Glaston Corporation, has this to say about the prospect:

“3D printing is a burning issue and was also discussed during the Glass Performance Days conference, held in June this year. 3D printing is a real possibility for the industry and will eventually change the total glass production chain. 3D printing will affect manufacturing of glass processing machines and Glaston wants to be in the forefront of this development.”

So, what exactly will visitors to Glaston’s Vitrum glass exhibit? To showcase 3D printing glass capabilities, “a 3D printed miniature model of the latest tempering line model will be seen at the stand.” Glass tempering is a process whereby glass0 sheets are heated — in a large industrial-sized furnace style machine — and then cooled quickly, resulting in a strengthened glass product. Glaston’s new tempering line is none other than the Glaston FC1000  which “continues FC500 tempering line’s renowned heritage.” According to Glaston, “FC1000 meets all demands for flatter and optically flawless glass. In addition, the furnace provides a significant increase in energy efficiency and Low-E glass tempering capacity.”

I’m telling you, this is exciting. Glaston will also be showcasing its Glaston ProL, a flat laminating line, and the Glaston Matrix, which is a “new OEM-windshield press for bending deep sags and wrap round corners to tightest tolerances and with active convection heating to enhance production of windshields with conductive or heat reflective coatings.” Did you catch all of that?

vitrum-2015

If you are interested in 3D printing and glass possibilities, you can catch Glaston’s exhibit out this week at Vitrum in Milan, Italy. As Glaston states in a recent press release: “Only a firm gaze and a pair of glasses are needed for this unique experience.”

Share this Article


Recent News

4D Printing in Singapore: Researchers Pair Compliant Mechanisms with Chitosan Biopolymers

HP and NTU Singapore Officially Open Joint Corporate 3D Printing Lab



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing News Briefs: January 22, 2020

In today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, we’ve got a 2019 recap, a new 3D printing conference, a new 3D printer, and a 3D printed medicine story. Prusa is sharing how...

Victrex and University of Exeter Commission EOS P 810 to Commercialize PAEK Materials

Back in the summer of 2018, high-performance polymer solutions provider Victrex, based in the UK, announced that it had developed new PAEK 3D printing materials. PAEK, or polyaryletherketone, is a family...

Sponsored

3D Printing Is Ready for Manufacturing Primetime—Are We?

When the World Economic Forum reported that the value to society and industry of digital transformation across industries could exceed $100 trillion—yes, trillion—by 2025, we knew that wouldn’t happen without...

3D Printing News Briefs: December 15, 2019

In this edition of 3D Printing News Briefs, it’s business, business, and then an upcoming event. 3D Alliances signed a collaboration agreement with Xact Metal. Sigma Labs has appointed a...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Services & Data

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!