3DS’ New Fabricate Application: 4 Steps to Wearable Fashion Right Off a Cube 3D Printer

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cube logoWe’ve seen 3D printed fashion already, tromping down runways and looking fierce (or some that’s more ferocious than fierce)…but let’s be honest: like most runway ensembles, it really isn’t meant for daily wear. The idea of being able to turn to a desktop machine for everyday clothing choices still seems a little bit fantastic, but we’re getting ever closer to designing or redesigning an outfit at the drop (or don) of a hat.

Customization is one of the most deservedly heralded aspects of 3D design, allowing for ultimate creative freedom–which is just what fashion designers often want most. So, when it comes down to it, so do the rest of us, even if not to quite the same degree. Sometimes what we crave in an outfit is just a tweak to make it more our own. And maybe that’s the best way to start out with fashion design from a 3D printer: one piece at a time.

fabricate projectsToday, 3D Systems has announced the launch of their all-new Fabricate application for use with the Cube 3D printer. Fabricate allows for the use of .textile files to create clothes, embellishments, and accessories with a custom flair.

Fabricate is a celebration of 3D technology and fashion fusion, a completely new way of accessorizing that is accessible to everyone. 3D Tech-Style printing lets fashion happen easily, enabling the creation of truly stunning attire. designsI can’t wait to see how people use this technology to push the boundaries of fashion,” noted 3DS’ Creative Director, Annie Shaw.

Fabricate is available now, providing immediate access to patterns, ideas, and tutorials. Three printed .textile designs for sewing projects unlike any others are offered exclusively at Cubify, and more will be released monthly. Fashion designers will also work together with the team at 3DS to produce collaborative designs bringing together traditional textile design with 3D technology.

To create a design using Fabricate, all you have to do is:

  • Pick a pattern (and probably think out where you’ll be placing it)
  • Print on your Cube 3D printer (which will require some glue, special fabric, and a quick pause)
  • Sew the fabric print onto your piece where you want it
  • Wear it!

Watching a quick tutorial on Fabricate shows how smooth the process is; when step four of a four-step process is “wear it,” you know it can’t be too tricky! This tutorial illustrates the creation of a modular neckline:

Designs like this modular neckline and embellishments for pockets can add some texture and fun to any ensemble. If that sort of patterning might not be your aesthetic, there might still be something in the collection for you. With triangles, spikes, and squares available now, you might just find something fun to add to a shoulder, pocket, waistline, or sleeve of your shirt or jacket, or a design to really make your bag your own.

fabricateTo get started with the entire system, you can purchase the entire Fabricate Starter Pack, which comes with everything you’ll need from printer to designs. The Starter Pack, available for $1,199, includes a Cube 3D printer, white and neon green PLA cartridges as well as a PLA cartridge of your choice (in black, white, or pale yellow), 24 squares of fabric, glue, and six downloadable .textile designs. If you already have a Cube, you can instead buy Design Packs for $149, including a pale yellow PLA cartridge, 24 textile squares, glue, and six .textile designs. Both are available online at the Fabricate web store. You can also find other supplies there to restock as you keep designing, including more glue ($9) to stabilize your prints, and a cartridge pack (including black, white, pale yellow, and coral PLA) for $190.

Let us know if you try out your own designs in the Fabricate forum thread over at 3DPB.com. We’d love to see some photos of your creations!

 

 

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