3D Printing a City, An Architect’s Dream

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Every day, more and more companies, spanning almost every area of business adopt 3D printing as a method of increased productivity. Take for example an architecture and design firm named Perkins+Will. The firm specializes in corporate, commercial, and civic design, has approximately 1,500 employees, and has been in business for close to 80 years. How does a company like this succeed over such a long period of time? Adapt to the latest technologies.

city-1This is just what Perkins+Will has done. They have adopted the latest technologies, specifically 3D printing, into their work environment. The company currently has 7 Makerbot Replicator 2 3D Printers. These printers have changed how the clients are presented with ideas, giving them a whole new perspective on things. When a client is pitched an idea for a development, they now have the ability to truly see a 3D representation of what the designer’s idea includes. Instead of having to look at 3D images on a 2D computer screen, or paper, they can get up from their seat, walk around their development idea, and give immediate feedback to the architect.

“The earlier you can look at a physical object, the sooner you can understand a building and also make better design decisions,” said W. Scott Allen, an associate architect and designer for Perkins+Will. Rapid prototyping profoundly changes our own creative process. “Making all of these on the MakerBot frees us up to test more ideas for clients and come at a nicer solution in the same time frame. You can almost print at the same speed that you can draw,” he continued.

 


Scott usually will set up his Makerbot Replicator in the afternoon, prior to leaving work for the day. When he returns the next morning he has a whole development printed out and ready to show his clients. By doing this, he saves himself a lot of time to work on other more important aspects of a project, while giving his company the edge they need to continue a successful business for the next 80 years.

Discuss this article here:  https://3dprintboard.com/showthread.php?1691-How-Perkins-Will-Use-3D-Printing-for-Architecture

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