Game of Thrones Inspires 3D Printed Iron Throne

Share this Article

IMG_20150604_172821Possibly if the warring clans of Westeros had only had access to a 3D printer, some of the violence could have been avoided. Why fight over the actual throne, when you could have this lovely 3D printed version? Sure, it’s smaller than the real thing, but maybe you could make up for that by riding a really big horse or wearing some extra jewelry.

When Thingiverse contributor Revennant released this 3D Iron Throne model for others to print (fully capable of providing the best seat in the house for a smartphone), s/he probably didn’t realize that it might have prevented five seasons of strife, sex, elaborate costuming, and, well, more sex. Not that anybody would have wanted that. What s/he probably did know is that with a record gross viewing audience of 18.6 million viewers there would be a lot of people taking a careful look at the model and also contributing their own versions.

The original Iron Throne is supposed to have been forged from 1,000 swords that were surrendered to Aegon the Conqueror, the first Targaryen King and the ruler who managed to subdue six of the seven kingdoms of Westerns and bring them under his control. IMG_20150604_000358Of course, someone has since gone and counted the number of swords in the version depicted in the show and discovered that there are only 200. That’s the kind of attention to detail Revennant could expect from her/his audience.

A particularly stellar version of Revennant was produced by Miguel Molina. Rather than using the metal from 1,000 swords, he used filament and a 3D printer. Molina has a close relationship with 3D printing and has created figurines and memorabilia related to video gaming. As an avid fan of retro gaming, his circles eventually expanded to include Game of Thrones and Revennant’s creation. Molina explained his connection with 3D printing:

“I used a LulzBot Mini to create the throne. I actually work at Aleph Objects in Loveland, CO. We build the LulzBot printers and I happen to work on the manufacturing line as an assembler! We take a lot of pride when building our machines so I had no doubts when I bought one for myself.”

Just because the throne is diminutive, approximately 6″ x 4″, doesn’t mean that it was created in a moment. In fact, it took 23 hours to print using HIPS on LulzBot’s fine setting. Once created using Cura, the post processing was also an involved process requiring not only time but a great deal of artistic talent as well. Since there isn’t an ‘Iron Throne’ paint color available at Home Depot, Molina invented his own concoction.IMG_20150604_173029

“I used a layer of white enamel spray primer,” said Molina, “then a second layer of black metallic spray paint. then, I hand brushed Citadel brand copper and steel color paints, the same kind of paints used for Warhammer figures, for the fine details.”

When not creating amazing 3D printed miniatures, or working creating the 3D printers themselves, Molina dedicates his time to fixing Blackhawk and Chinook helicopters for the Colorado Army National Guard. With this kind of talent, the folks producing Game of Thrones might want to add him to their ranks. Even if he couldn’t prevent the violence in Westeros, he sure could make everything there look awesome.

Let us know if you might make your own throne fit for a phone in the 3D Printed Iron Throne forum thread at 3DPB.com.

 

Share this Article


Recent News

Evonik Announces Additive Pricing Analysis Software

AMS 2020: Panels on 3D Printing in Implants and Orthopedics, Regulation in Additive Medical Devices



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Amplify Additive Adopts Arcam’s EBM for Orthopedic Production

Electron beam melting (EBM) has a unique place in the additive manufacturing (AM) industry in that there is only one EBM hardware manufacturer (GE Additive subsidiary Arcam) and the technology...

Korea: Improving Implants for Knee Arthroplasty with Titanium Porous Coating in Direct Energy Deposition

Korean researchers are looking for ways to improve the materials used in total knee arthroplasty procedures. Design and technique have improved considerably in the past 30 years, but here the...

Arburg Owners Purchase German RepRap

Among the first fused filament fabrication (FFF) startups to industrialize its technology, German RepRap has held a unique position in the additive manufacturing (AM) space. Now, the company may see...

Scott Dunham: SmarTech Industry Forecasts for Metal and Medical/Dental 3D Printing

The 2020 Additive Manufacturing Strategies (AMS) event ended earlier this week in Boston. The summit was focused on the business of 3D printing in medical, dental, and metals, so it...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!