German RepRap Releases Carbon20 3D Printer Filament, Offers Rigidity without Breakage

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logo_kleinIn the creative and often surprising world of design, engineering, art, and far more, success centers around great ideas that actually get to the drawing board and executed. And today, that worldwide ‘drawing board’ functions around having a sophisticated, high-tech arsenal of tools and materials. For those who are developing high-quality components for manufacturing, such as the automotive industry, there isn’t time to play around–and strength becomes key.

While materials are often specific to each project, with the industry standards such as ABS or PLA working just fine to get the job done for a variety of parts and 3D models–more and more often, industrial designers and engineers are seeking greater strength in their 3D prints, thus ushering in the popularity of 3D printing in metal and the demand for a variety of new carbon-based filaments.

While ABS and then PLA 3D printing filament arrived on the scene with the inception of the 3D printer and both offer the ability to easily produce beautiful prints, each comes with a list of pros and cons as well. For added durability, reliability, and longevity for 3D printed components, carbon is becoming key.

mainHeadquartered in Munich, German RepRap is known for experience in the manufacturing of both 3D printers and accompanying filament. As the industry expands and requirements from their client base become more specific, they steadily continue to add to their lineup of products and materials, based around the original RepRap technology and the idea of offering unlimited possibilities in 3D printing. Now, they’ve announced a new member of their filament family, by way of Carbon20.

Meant for 3D prints that will endure actual real-world use, and must therefore be designed for and capable of great functionality, Carbon20 is composed of, as its name would entail, twenty percent carbon fiber. The new filament performs well for 3D printed components that require a rigid, unyielding nature for reliability in industry.

Offering high dimensional accuracy with low distortion as well as low stretch at breaking point (8-10 percent), Carbon20 is now available in black matte in the 1.75mm size. Available through both German RepRap and their resellers throughout the world, it retails at $95.85 USD, and is available in the US through 3DChimera.

High temperature resistance coupled with high viscosity above melting temperature makes this an attractive material for those seeking 3D prints resulting in rigidity but not brittleness. Odor is not an issue either, and those using Carbon20 will be pleased to know that the filament is free of toxic styrenes. Other technical properties are as follows:

  • High flex modulus 6.2 GPa (899234 psi)
  • High glass transition temperature (approx. 80°C/176° F)
  • Printing temperature (tested on X400 3D Printer): 252°C/485.6°F
  • Bed temperature (tested on X400 3D Printer w/PET coating): 45°C/113°F

GermanRepRap-X400-DRIVE-VW-Forum01_600pxGerman RepRap recommends using stainless steel nozzles with Carbon20, with brass nozzles as an option with frequent replacement. The new 3D printing filament can be used with both the DD2 extruder and the DD3.

This new 3D printing filament should easily fit into the customer base German RepRap caters to across the globe for professionals looking for adding new strength as they are developing new products and 3D printing functional prototypes from the automotive industry to architecture, mold making, hobbyist endeavors, and more.

Is this a 3D printing filament you are interested in ordering? What sort of prototypes will you find Carbon20 useful for? Discuss in the German RepRap Releases Carbon20 3D Printing Filament forum thread over at 3DPB.com.

 

 

 

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