This 3D Printed Machine Allows You to Make French Fries and Potato Chips at Home

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fang1Ever since I was about 4 years old, my favorite food in the entire world has been potato chips. I don’t know what it is, or why I love them so much, but I literally go through several bags of these crispy, rather unhealthy snacks each week. In the past, I’ve tried to make my own homemade potato chips and even French fries, but have never had the success I’d like. Now, thanks to 3D printing there may be a solution for me and the other French fry and potato chip obsessed people of the world.

One of these people, who has a little bit in common with me, is a man named Carl Fang.

“I like chips very much, and often make fries at home, but it’s not uniform when I cut them with a knife,” Fang tells 3DPrint.com. “It’s very easy to hurt your fingers, so I wanted to create a quick and safe potato cutter.”

This is exactly what Fang ended up doing. He drew out designs of a product that he wanted to fabricate, and then using Rhino3D he modeled it on his computer. Once he believed he had the design files perfected for all of the different components, he decided it was time to 3D print his creation. The results? A very easy to use 3D printed French fry/potato chip making device that Fang calls the “Potato Chips Strip Cutting Machine.”

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“It’s very easy to operate the cutter. as you can see from the photos.” Fang tells us. “You just need to hold the handle and press down, and then it will cut potatoes using the lever motion.”

The device, Fang tells us, could use a metal grate in place of the 3D printed plastic one to make his creation more efficient and easier to use. Regardless though, it does the job in creating uniformly cut and potentially very tasty fries or chips.

fang2Fang has made the 3D printable design files available for anyone to download free of charge on 3D printing repository 3DShare. It was even one of the top designs on the site last month.

In all, there are 5 different STL files, consisting of 16 different 3D printed parts. Once printed out, they are rather easy to assemble and begin using.

Fang has also created other interesting designs such as the special “learning chopsticks” and a pair of working 3D printed scissors.

What do you think about this unique 3D printed machine? Have you tried printing one yourself to make your own homemade potato chips or fries? Discuss in the Potato Chip Machine forum thread on 3DPB.com.

 

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