3D Printable Vortex Water Nozzle May Revitalize Your Health and Help Grow Larger Plants

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vortexaniWe have previously covered several stories about a man named Thomas Palm. He is an innovator within the 3D printing space, not for the hardware itself, but for expanding upon what is and is not possible when it comes to fabricating objects via 3D printers. Palm has garnered attention for his 3D printed RC snow tires and spike tires, as well as many other unique creations such as a 3D printed robohand finger-sensor, and much more. His latest design, however, may just be the most intriguing yet.

“Lots of people claim that the water structure is very important,” Palm tells 3DPrint.com. “Our waters are getting worse every day and I felt the need to put some focus on this topic.”

This is true. Water pollution and water quality has been a major concern for environmentalists all over the globe. Whether it is our oceans being filled with garbage, or our drinking water we all rely on to survive, water quality should be of the utmost concern to everyone living on this planet.

When most people think of tap water, they simply see it as a fluid which is a necessity of life. It is all structured the same, and besides the different additives, pollutants, and minerals, in essence the water you find in a puddle beneath your feet in the United States is the same as the water found in a pond on the other side of the world. Over the years though, there have been researchers who have studied the effects of various means of enhancing water through methods of “structuring” it. Studies have shown that water which has been structured through a vortex process have allowed plants to grow faster and stronger, and even provide health benefits to humans who drink and bathe in it. While there are plenty of arguments to the contrary, many people throughout the world, including famous doctors and researchers, believe that water that has been structured through various techniques can provide ample benefits.

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Thomas Palm has focused on two methods of creating structured water, in his designs for 3D printed products. The first is via a vortex water nozzle, which he designed and 3D printed himself, and has also made available for others to download and print from Thingiverse.

The nozzle is made to fit most water nozzle adapters and hose connectors, and in the videos below he shows his creation in use. As you can see, the water coming out of the nozzle is thrust into a vortex motion which according to some studies add “structure” to the water molecules.

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Another method that many researchers believe can re-structure water is via magnetization.

“Also [it is] possible to add magnets to test restructuring of the water,” Palm explained. “Perhaps water ‘remembers’ toxins etc., and acts like it still is in the water even if filtered out by carbon filters etc. Imagine what that does to the drinking water that circulates back to the tap from the sewers. Magnets might restructure (reset) the ‘water molecule clusters’ since the H2O molecule has a negative and a positive side. Lots of people are doing research and it looks like the industry successfully uses water treatment that suggests that it’s a fact.”

Palm plans to further test this method using a Gummy Magneter in another future project.

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There is a lot of debate on whether or not water can really be restructured in a beneficial way via methods like these put forth by Palm. However, he is neither agreeing with nor denying the fact that this actually works. He is merely making his vortex nozzle available for anyone interested in testing its possibilities to do so.

Palm's Magnet Rendering

Palm’s Magnet Rendering

What do you think about the idea of re-structuring water via vortex nozzles? Does it really work? Does it provide any benefits? Have you printed Palm’s nozzle and given it a try? Discuss in the 3D Printed Vortex Nozzle forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out the videos below.

 

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