New taulman3D t-glase Polar White Filament Developed For and Used in Food Rising’s Grow Box Systems

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t-glase-polar-white-final-3d-print-objects-600T-glase Polar White 3D printing filament, from taulman3D, was co-developed by the “Health Ranger,” Mike Adams, a Texas-based lab science director and inventor who worked with taulman3D to create the strong, water-tight material as part of his non-profit project Food Rising. The FoodRising.org site is dedicated to sustainable mini-farm concepts.

While the original t-glase filament is clear, the new t-glase Polar White is opaque and significantly stronger than the existing line of t-glase filaments. Adams says it has a very high structural integrity and high resistance to delamination.

T-glase Polar White achieves high flow rates–at relatively low print nozzle temperatures–and features minimal shrinkage during the printing process and very high durability of the finished object.

t-glase-polar-white-threaded-object-600Adams says he uses t-glase Polar White filament to produce functional valve parts used in his hydroponic Food Rising grow systems.

“We needed a 3D printer filament that would produce water-tight, functional parts with small nozzles that resisted breaking,” Adams says. “It also had to print reliably, even on non-heated print beds. Nothing else existed on the market with these properties, so I reached out to the Taulman company for a custom solution.”

The result of the work was so effective that taulman3D added this new filament to their materials line, which includes t-glase, Bridge Nylon, and a number of other filament types.

According to Adams, t-glase Polar White prints with exceptional precision as witnessed by his ability to print the fine threads needed to build parts like the float valve included in his Food Rising Grow Box.

Adams has donated 250 of his Food Rising Mini-Farm Grow Box systems to schools, universities, community centers, and churches across America. He says he hopes that helping teach children how to grow their own food–while teaching them about 3D printing technology–will benefit both nutrition and science learning.

t-glase-polar-white-print-farm-objects-600The prints shown here were made at Adams’ print farm using 20 lb. spools of t-glase Polar White.

Makerfront.com says that strength test figures will be posted on their site for t-glase Polar White once numbers are returned from the local test lab and a few university labs they’ve contacted to accumulate data. They say the testing process involves printing several “test bars” at 5″ x 0.5″ x 0.25″.

T-glase is specifically made of FDA approved polymers for direct food contact products and containers, and those uses include cups and other liquid storage parts. Makerfront.com adds that while T-glase is not biodegradable like PLA, it is considered “100% reclaimable.”

Adams says the t-glase Polar White development process sprung directly from his desire to help defend the rights of home gardeners and protect the medical freedom rights of parents.

What to you think of the new t-glase Polar White filament? Let us know in the t-glase Polar White forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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Mike Adams

Mike Adams

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