WASP Moves Closer to 3D Printing Low Cost Homes by Unveiling New 3D Printer Extruder

Share this Article

waspextruder2Back in July, the WASPProject unveiled to us their plans to 3D print homes in 3rd world countries using nothing but a 3D printer and clay made from native soil. The idea is a tremendous one, one which could be extraordinarily groundbreaking when it comes to creating shelter for poverty stricken nations.

Clay is abundant, and these 3D printers are quite affordable compared to other machines on the market. Providing a single 3D printer to small communities where there is little to no structurally sound housing, could provide for a solution to one of the world’s biggest problems.  The fabrication of multiple homes in a short amount of time, is exactly what WASP is hoping to accomplish.

Today, WASP has informed 3DPrint.com that they are unveiling a new 3D printer extruder at 3D Print Hub Milan, an event taking place in Italy this weekend (March 5-7). The extruder, which will be officially unveiled, alongside their new Wasp Delta 20 40 Turbo 3D Printer, aims at making the 3D printing of affordable housing a reality.

waspextruder

The WASP Big Delta at the Milan Show

 

“WASP Founder Massimo Moretti and his collaborators [haven’t] forgot their main focus: to build 3D printed houses with a very low cost, especially in developing counties,” WASP tells 3DPrint.com. “Now [we are at] the turning point: WASP exhibits for the first time at 3D Print Hub in Milan the new extruder.”

This new extruder has been completely redesigned, with a special “rotating” feature. It requires very little energy consumption, has the ability to clean itself, and it can be assembled and disassembled in a very short amount of time. It also includes what WASP tells us is a “constant speed control”. The extruder also has the ability to be scaled up or down for use on different size 3D printers, including the company’s 12-meter tall delta machine.

The new extruder.

The new extruder.

More details will be unveiled this weekend, and WASP has plans to reveal additional information on their plans to 3D print houses in developing nations very soon. It should be interesting to find out when this initiative will begin, and if they can perhaps raise additional charitable funding in order to help it progress. Housing is in major demand in the developing world, and this project could be one huge step in helping bring homes to those in need.

What do you think about the potential that WASP provides for 3D printing houses in developing countries. Do you think this method is feasible? Discuss in the 3D Printing of Homes forum thread on 3DPB.com.

The new extruder.

The new extruder.

Share this Article


Recent News

Hybrid Construction 3D Printing in Japan Combines Advantages of Wet & Dry Spraying

3D Printing for the Fourth of July



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D printed automobiles

3D Printed Food


You May Also Like

Research Challenges Accuracy of FDM 3D-Printed Medical Models

Ben Searle and Deborah Starkey, both Australian researchers from Queensland University of Technology, explore better ways to create 3D-printed medical models. Their findings are outlined in the recently published “An...

Macotakara 3D Prints iPhone 12 Mockups

Sucking up hours of attention from users around the world since 2007, the iPhone has been a huge source of profit for Apple. The Cupertino-based company, founded in 1976 by...

Hey Model! 3D Printed Interactive & Modular Models Assist Blind & Limited Vision Users

Australian researchers Samuel Reinders, Matthew Butler, and Kim Marriott are exploring ways to improve 3D printed tools for individuals who are blind or have low vision (BLV). Releasing the details...

Appliance Maker Miele Offers 3D Printable Accessories on Thingiverse

Though it has yet to reach a widespread saturation point, we are slowly witnessing the birth of 3D printable replacement parts and accessories for consumer goods. The latest evidence of...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.