Back to 1984: 3D Print Your Own Retro Mini Apple Computer, or Purchase One on Etsy

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Charles Mangin is too cool for school, taking us back to the computer science lab of the ’80s when Apple was infiltrating secondary schools and higher learning institutions, much like a number of the innovative 3D printing companies such as Stratasys, 3DS, and Tinkerine — amongst many others — are doing today. The Apple remains almost as much a precious commodity today as it did back then, and even more beloved since the passing of the iconic Steve Jobs, who was always on a mission to give us all higher quality and expected it from himself exponentially.

While Jobs was applauded for having the courage to be outspoken and try new things with products and business models, continually innovating and leaving competitors in the dust, we all still fourlove to go back and look at the retro Apple products — and some Apple lovers, like Charles Mangin, are motivated enough to mold them in 3D printing. Harkening back to the bulky 1984 //c Apple, this is an amazing miniature Apple featuring a Raspberry Pi Model A+ setup with USB keyboard on the side and combo A/V plug on the back, as well as a micro-SD card underneath the Pi.

The files can be downloaded at Thingiverse for the Apple IIc Raspberry Pi case – Model A+ and the Apple Monitor IIc – 2.5” LCD, and Mangin actually takes those parts to the third step with sanding, painting, and assembling, and sells them at Etsy. Parts are also available at Shapeways.

For the IIc case or //c , Mangin made minor required changes so that he could use the Pi, and he makes note that the handle does not rotate completely. The Apple monitor files are available and twoMangin notes that the scale is 1:4, with a working 2.5” LCD, which is easy to use with simple connections.

While you can purchase the piece fully assembled from Etsy, if you choose to piece your Apple together on your own, you’ll need the 2.5″ LCD display and actuated switch fits the 12 mm tactile switch with the base being attached with #8 machine screws.

Mangin has a penchant for building retro miniaturized computers so that we can all remember our digital origins. He hints that he might be able to eventually come up with a working miniature mouse and keyboard as well. We’ll keep an eye on his future projects with interest.

Is this a 3D model you are interested in 3D printing, assembling, and finishing yourself? Are you thinking of purchasing the parts ready made? Tell us your thoughts on Mangin’s retro Apple at the 3D Print your own Retro Apple forum at 3DPB.com.  Check out the assembly video below:


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