Cyclist Breaks Speed Record Riding Partially 3D Printed Bike

Share this Article

[Image: Moss Bikes]

3D printing is playing a big role in mobility, from airplanes to automobiles and motorcycles. It’s also showing up more and more in the construction of bicycles. Whether they’re experimental or award-winning, these bikes are demonstrating the many possibilities of 3D printing. In mobility applications, the goals are mostly the same – to create a vehicle that is stronger, lighter weight, and thus faster and more efficient than traditional models. 3D printing can achieve all of these things, and is thus becoming a more popular method of fabricating bikes, cars and planes – including those designed to break speed records.

If there was any doubt that 3D printing can create a fast bike, cyclist Neil Campbell has cast it aside. Campbell was riding a bicycle with 3D printed components when he broke the European motor-assisted cycling speed record a few days ago. Campbell reached a speed of 217.7 km (135.3 miles) per hour, beating the previous record of 204 km (127 miles) per hour. Motor-assisted means that he was towed behind a car, in this case a 2018 Porsche Cayenne, before being released to zoom off into history.

Campbell’s next goal, of course, is the world record, which is 268.8 km (approximately 167 miles) per hour, set by Fred Rompelberg of the Netherlands in Utah in October 1995.

Neil Campbell [Image: Adam Ross/PA]

The cyclist was riding a converted 20-year-old tandem bicycle created by Moss Bikes, using 3D printed parts to turn it into a lightweight, fast, record-breaking machine. Campbell’s speed was recorded as he pedaled through a 200-meter “gate.”

“I can’t stress that this is very much a team event, who all have to perform for it to happen,” Campbell said. “The driver in particular is under tremendous pressure.”

The record-setting event was the culmination of 20 years of hard work; Campbell states that he is “fixated by speed.” He already holds the British and Commonwealth bicycle speed record from pedaling only, at 114 mph.

Details of how 3D printing was used to modify the bike were not released, but it only takes a few small alterations to greatly improve the performance of a bicycle. Recently, Silicon Valley startup AREVO showcased a 3D printed bicycle made from carbon fiber. The bike featured a simplified design that removed a seat stay between the seat and the back wheel, which is a small adjustment that made the bike much stronger. Using 3D printing was also much less expensive than traditional methods, and faster as well, allowing it to be made in 18 days instead of 18 months.

[Image: John Bearby/PA]

Whether for show or for breaking records, 3D printed bicycles are becoming more common as manufacturers and riders both realize the potential the technology has to improve performance, as well as offer unprecedented customization options. It’s unclear if Campbell will use the same bicycle to try to break the world speed record, but after his performance this week, it won’t be a surprise if he relies on 3D printing again.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

 

Facebook Comments

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing and the Circular Economy Part 7: the Viability of 3D Printing

What is Metrology Part 2: CMM



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

What is Metrology?

3D Metrology  What is 3D metrology? Metrology is the science of measurement. It establishes a common understanding of units, crucial in linking and understanding human activities. When we apply metrology...

Interview with Mei Ogata of JTL America on Testing for 3D Printing

As we move from prototyping to production, testing is becoming more and more important. Crucial in qualifying parts and materials, but also in establishing QA or developing new materials, testing...

Fast Things 8: The Shape Game and Mrs. Incredible

Imagine the answer to life, the universe, and everything is: donut. In a world of Fast Things, 3D Printing is the logical production technology. With our technology, you can go...

3D Printing News Briefs: June 8, 2019

In this week’s 3D Printing News Briefs, we’re talking about partnerships, new software and buildings, and a neat 3D printed miniature. Together, Evolve Additive Solutions and Evonik are developing materials...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Print Services

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!