Peacock Receives 3D Printed Prosthetic Foot From Generous Reddit User

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One of the best aspects of 3D printing is its ability to help animals all around the world. From prosthetics to walking aids, it’s proven to be an affordable and versatile solution for a wide range of pet owners.

In a video posted on YouTube, a Wyoming man named Mike described how his family’s pet peacock lost its left foot due to frostbite during the winter. He was desperately looking for a solution that could offer the peacock a better quality of life since they can live up to 25 years.

peacock-3d-printed-foot

Cassidy the peacock with his new prosthetic foot.

“We called the vet and went back and forth and it was determined that he was going to lose his foot,” Mike said in the video. “The vet was correct and his foot just fell off.”

The stump healed quickly, but without some sort of prosthetic, the peacock would likely have to be put down.  Fortunately for Mike and his family, one of their channel subscribers saw the video and posted on Reddit that it was time to help the peacock. The user offered to design the prosthetic foot and ended up modeling it after one that was originally made for a stork.

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Peacock leg stump

“Every day of our lives are spent with and around animals. You build a rapport and a relationship with them that you can’t find anywhere else,” the peacock’s owner added. “When your wife and kids are crying because an animal might have to be put down, it becomes a mission to do your best to save it.”

After receiving the dimensions from the peacock owner, the user finalized the design, had the parts 3D printed and shipped the new foot to the family.

Mike said, “It’s amazing that people took their time and money to help us and a peacock that they will more than likely never meet.”

The peacock was transferred to a new enclosure and had time to get used to his new surroundings before the prosthetic foot was attached. When the time came, felt padding was added to the connection area and support brackets secured the leg in place. The bird seemed slightly confused when first trying out the prosthetic, but after some adjustments to the angle, he was able to stand on his own. However, the peacock was still using his left wing to balance, something he needed to do after his foot fell off.

Over the next few days, the peacock was closely monitored and would occasionally have his new foot taken off.

“The new leg is held on by zip ties for now, not too tight and not too loose,” Mike details, adding that Velcro straps may be added on to make it more convenient to take the leg off.

Mike says they’ll occasionally check back with updates to show how the peacock is progressing.

What do you think of this peacock’s new prosthetic foot? Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

[Source/Photos/Video: Our Wyoming Life]

 

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