3D Printing and Robotics Drive Next-Generation Automotive Repair Project

Share this Article

The automobiles of the future are becoming the automobiles of the present, as autonomous vehicles begin to take to the streets and manufacturers display 3D printed cars. Now a new partnership is bringing futuristic technologies into automotive repairs as well. Swinburne University of Technology is partnering with the Innovative Manufacturing Cooperative Research Centre (IMCRC) and Tradiebot Industries for a project called Repair Bot, which will utilize 3D printing, robotics and advanced materials to develop an automated repair service for plastic car parts.

Material wastage is a problem for the automotive industry at present, as are a limited availability of skilled labor and complex design elements that limit repair capabilities. The goal of the Repair Bot project is for robots to be able to repair those complex elements rather than waste money and material on costly replacement parts. Using 3D scanning and 3D printing, the service will repair cars on the same day that they are brought in. If you’ve ever had to spend weeks without your car while waiting for a replacement part, that’s a dream come true.

Mario Dimovski (center)

“The ability to repair previously non-repairable parts using world-first technology will reduce overall repair times and repair costs,” said Tradiebot Industries Founder Mario Dimovski. “It will also create real and significant export opportunities and has flow-on benefits for the environment by reducing land-fill. Tradiebot will also deliver new future skills to the industry as more processes become automated.”

The Repair Bot project, according to the participants, will go a long way towards advancing Industry 4.0 and advanced manufacturing technologies, particularly digital manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing and robotics.

“Industry 4.0 is all about ways of using digital technologies and connectivity to integrate the value stream,” said Dr. Mats Isaksson, senior research fellow from Swinburne University’s Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology. “In the case of this project, knowledge can be captured regarding design information, supply and logistics, as well as distributed manufacturing capacity.”

Novel polymer materials will be used in conjunction with 3D printing for the project. The service is expected to be not only fast but low cost, and will focus on plastic trim and assembly components. Swinburne University will play a large role in research and development for the project.

“We will rely heavily on the Swinburne team to research, develop, document and problem-solve,” said Dimovski. “This will be vital as we invent various aspects of this world-first automated system that will revolutionise repairs of plastic components.”

[Image: Tradiebot]

IMCRC CEO and Managing Director David Chuter believes that the Repair Bot project has large implications for the future of manufacturing as a whole.

“We (IMCRC) are excited about the collaboration between Tradiebot, Swinburne University and IMCRC,” he said. “This is a unique partnership that explores and invests in advanced manufacturing technologies. It is a great example of how research-led innovation ensures that the Australian automotive repairs industry can meet the challenges and opportunities of the global economy.”

The Repair Bot project has already gathered more than $1.2 million in funding, and research will take place through 2018 and 2019.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

[Source/Images: Swinburne University of Technology unless otherwise noted]

 

Share this Article


Recent News

First Lithium Solid State Battery Produced by 3D Printing Startup Sakuu

RAPID + TCT Celebrate 30th Year with More 3D Printing Presentations, Speakers, & Exhibitors



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: July 25th, 2021

From compact SLS 3D printing and SOLIDWORKS certifications to full-color 3D printing, 3D printing for cosmetic dentistry, photopolymers, and more, we’ve got a lot of topics covered in this week’s...

Sponsored

Trump the Mundane Performance in Smart Printing — Creality CR-10 Smart Vanquishes with Advanced Functions

In an era that 3D printing functions seems to sit in a stereotyped mundane track, how to renovate turns to be of much importance that often draws the attention of...

Sponsored

3D Printing vs. CNC Machining

What’s the Best Way to Make Your Part? CNC machining is a common subtractive manufacturing technology. Unlike 3D printing, the process typically begins with a solid block of material (blank)...

3D Printing News Briefs, July 17, 2021: SME, Z3DLAB & CNRS, GKN Additive, FibreTuff & RSNA, Nano Dimension & Hensoldt, ioTech

In today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, we’ll tell you about a rebranded case study award, and then a few stories about 3D printing materials. Finishing up, we’re sharing news about...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.