XJet to Introduce New Additive Manufacturing System at formnext

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Israel-based company XJet is the creator of NanoParticle Jetting, a groundbreaking technology that 3D prints using inkjet methods to deposit metal materials. The company followed that up with Ceramic NanoParticle Jetting technology, which uses the same methods to print with ceramic materials, and now as formnext approaches in a few weeks, XJet is introducing a new additive manufacturing system that enhances both technologies.

The XJet Carmel AM System line consists of two 3D printers: the Carmel 700 and the Carmel 1400. The printers are distinguished by their ability to print two separate inks for build material and support material, using NanoParticle Jetting technology.

“NanoParticle Jetting technology is a unique 3D inkjet technology that redefines additive manufacturing for metals and ceramics,” said Hanan Gothait, CEO and Founder of XJet. “Other additive manufacturing technologies use powders, but we offer a real breakthrough by leveraging our know-how as pioneers of both inkjet printing and 3D printing industries. Our solution prints very fine layers of both build materials and a support material to enable the creation of complex geometries in a very simple and very safe process. While we are currently printing only one build material, we could theoretically print multiple build materials.”

The Carmel 1400 and the Carmel 700, according to XJet, offer excellent detail, surface finish and accuracy. They’re simple and safe to operate, and allow for a high level of design flexibility and strong geometrical and physical properties. Support removal is extremely easy with the new system. Convenient features include an easy-to-use touchscreen interface and remote monitoring via mobile app.

Applications include short-run manufacturing, on-demand manufacturing, and prototyping for industries such as:

  • Healthcare and medical devices
  • Dental
  • Automotive
  • Aerospace and aviation
  • Consumer goods
  • Jewelry and apparel
  • Energy
  • Tooling

The two 3D printers differ mainly in their build size; the Carmel 1400 offers a build area of 500 x 280 x 200 mm (19.7 x 11 x 7.9 inches) and the 700 has a build area of 500 x 140 x 200 mm (19.7 x 5.5 x 7.9 inches). You can learn more about both systems here.

“The XJet Carmel 1400 features a 1,400-square cm build tray, one of the industry’s largest, for high-capacity production and a unique ability to print both ceramics and metals,” said XJet CBO Dror Danai. “The XJet Carmel 1400 system has already been delivered to a customer site and further details will be provided during the formnext exhibition.”

The formnext conference and exhibition will be taking place in Frankfurt, Germany from November 14 to 17. XJet will be presenting the Carmel system at its booth in Hall 3.1, Booth E20. On Tuesday, November 14 at 13:30 Danai will present the company’s NanoParticle Jetting technology for both metal and ceramic 3D printing, and at 17:30 the company will hold an informal reception for the public at the booth; 3DPrint.com is looking forward to attending and catching up again this year after last seeing Danai at this summer’s AM Conference.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

[Images: XJet]

 

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