Polish Company Glaze Prosthetics Offers Customizable 3D Printed Prosthetics

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Obviously, it’s not the easiest thing to be missing a limb – even if you have prosthetic devices that can help you perform different tasks and activities, it’s still a struggle doing things on your own. While we hear a lot about 3D printed prosthetics these days, that doesn’t change the fact that the market for traditional prosthetics is still pretty limited. Just as GE software engineer Lyman Connor, founder of the Handsmith nonprofit initiative, was inspired to make 3D printed bionic hands after a chance encounter with a boy in need of a prosthetic hand, so too was Kraków, Poland-based Glaze Prosthetics inspired by another person with only one arm, and according to Co-Founder Franek Kosch, the new company makes some pretty “amazing stuff.”

“What is so amazing? Our arm prosthetics, designed by designers not technicians, printed in SLS and finished by artists not regular painters,” Kosch told 3DPrint.com.

Rather than amputees feeling ashamed of their disabilities, Glaze believes that instead, they should use them to their advantage. The company is making 3D printed designer arm prosthetics – completely customized arms that give amputees “unlimited options to create themselves.”

“Missing an arm is nothing shameful,” declares the Glaze Prosthetics website. “On the contrary, it’s an opportunity to express yourself and your style. In short, creating yourself!”

Piotr Sajdak working out while wearing a Glaze prosthetic

It all started when Kosch, and Glaze CEO Grzegorz Kosch, heard the story of how Piotr Sajdak, a cook and contestant on the Polish version of the Master Chef TV show, lost his right arm  – he stepped in to defend his female friend when she was being harassed while trying to enjoy a night out. Luckily, his friend was okay, but he lost his arm in the encounter, though it didn’t slow him down one bit. The fact that Sajdak continued living an active lifestyle after what is admittedly a horrifying incident is what ultimately inspired Glaze, and Kosch reached out to the chef; thus, the Glaze Prosthetic was brought to life.

The goal of Glaze Prosthetics is complete and total individualization for amputees – they are making all of the design decisions for the personalized arms, including the traditional choices like colors. But the company is taking it one step further, and also allowing people to decide on the shape of their 3D printed prosthetics, and even to add cool ideas like high-tech accessories.

“We have features suitable for people who love sports, cooking, dancing, swimming, etc. We see amputees as people with loads of interests, and we want to help them improve themselves,” explained Kosch. “Through Glaze, they will gain not only a useful tool, but also more confidence and a chance to turn their life around. After all, what made Iron Man and Batman super heroes was their hi-tech equipment.”

These are definitely prosthetic arms built for superheroes, and not just in terms of looks – the company has made 3D printed prosthetic arms with phone compartments and built-in speakers. Want a prosthetic arm with a fin hand, or one with an actual tattoo? No problem! According to Glaze, the only limitation its 3D printed prosthetics have is amputees’ imaginations.

The company wants its clients to make all of the choices for their prosthetics, so that they are a true representation of what they love – the designed limbs should reflect not only their physical needs, but also their mental ones. These are not generic prosthetics, which can be heavy and uncomfortable – all of the Glaze prosthetics are measured to fit individual clients. The 3D printed prosthetics have a simple, modern look to them, but many are also “packed with useful functions.”

Here is the most exciting thing about these custom, 3D printed prosthetics – starting on October 31st, you will actually be able to purchase them online. If you’re interested in your own 3D printed Glaze prosthetic arm, visit the website and leave your email address to get a 20% discount. You can also check out the company on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to see more of its custom 3D printed prosthetics.

What do you think of Glaze Prosthetics? Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com, or share your thoughts below. 

[Source/Images: Glaze Prosthetics]

 

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