Want to Win a Sinterit Lisa? Enter the New SLS Printer 3D Design Challenge, Hosted by Sinterit and MyMiniFactory

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3D printer company Sinterit, which introduced its first product, the desktop SLS Lisa, two years ago, has recently teamed up with 3D printable model marketplace MyMiniFactory to launch the first consumer SLS printer 3D design challenge. MyMiniFactory is no stranger to hosting design competitions with 3D printer manufacturers, with thousands of entries submitted over the years, but according to the contest page, this is the first competition that was created especially for consumer SLS 3D printing design.

According to MyMiniFactory, “SLS 3D printing brings with it it’s own set of unique benefits and challenges, and through this competition MyMiniFactory is tasking their community with embracing the capabilities of the Sinterit Lisa in order to produce 3D printable designs that showcase what this machine can do.”

While the SLS Lisa 3D printer recently enjoyed a price break, that doesn’t mean it’s cheap. But the 3D printing industry is ready for an affordable, consumer-grade desktop SLS 3D printer, which is why the grand prize for the Sinterit 3D Print Design Competition is the Lisa itself, which is worth $7,000. The system can produce moving and joined components in a single print, and is perfect for highly detailed print jobs.

The design challenge has been broken down into three separate themes, which fit with the types of designs one might typically use the Sinterit Lisa to print – Mechanical, Math Art, and Jewelry. Designers are allowed to enter designs into all of the themes, as many times as they want.

The contest page reads, “So what do you have to do to take home this amazing prize? Show off your 3D design skills of course!”

The panel of judges from Sinterit and MyMiniFactory will looking to see that designs are “well thought out” for SLS 3D printers, which have different capabilities than FDM and SLA printers. For example, the plug and play Sinterit Lisa, which has a maximum build volume of 90 x 100 x 120 mm, offers freedom of form, durable prints, and no support material.

“Take these all into consideration when creating your designs, judges from MyMiniFactory and Sinterit will be looking at how you incorporate those features into your work and will decide on their favourite designs,” the contest page reads.

Sinterit will be printing the entered submissions on the Lisa, and images of the completed prints will be shared on the MyMiniFactory platform, together with the STL files for the designs. This will help designers see what their creations look like when 3D printed with SLS technology, so they can make a fully informed decision on whether or not they want to purchase their own Lisa 3D printer if they don’t win the contest.

Only one overall winner will be chosen by the judges, based on entries from the three themes. The Mechanical theme encourages designers to create mechanical designs that print in one piece, thanks to the durable, support-free printing that the Lisa offers. The Math Art theme asks designers to use algorithms to create works of art, while you are asked to take advantage of SLS printing properties to create jewelry that’s simple or intricate for the Jewelry theme.

MyMiniFactory has offered some helpful tips to help you win a 3D design competition, including:

  • Think about your design(s) in relation to the Design Brief and how you might best optimize it specifically for SLS 3D printing.
  • Make sure your designs adhere to all the guidelines – especially the size – of the Sinterit Lisa 3D printer.
  • Be as creative as you can – since you won’t need support material, you’re able to design in innovative ways. The only limit is the size of the print bed.

Don’t forget to post your design, once it’s approved, on Twitter with #MadeForSinterit, and tag Sinterit and MyMiniFactory as well. There is no entry fee for the Sinterit 3D Print Design Competition; check out the Terms and Conditions to learn more contest information. Contest submissions close on October 17th, so get to work and good luck!

Thinking about entering the contest? Let us know, and discuss other 3D printing topics, at 3DPrintBoard.com, or share your thoughts below.

 

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