Additive Manufacturing Strategies

ZMorph Introduces New VX Multitool 3D Printer and Revamped Voxelizer Software

ST Medical Devices

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Since Poland-based ZMorph released its ZMorph 2.0 SX multitool desktop manufacturing solution last year – which enhanced the already great capabilities of the company’s original 2.0 S system – the system’s additive and subtractive technologies have been used to make all sorts of interesting objects, from a revolving bookshelf and an antique rifle to shoes and a multifunctional walker prototype. I can’t wait to see what the maker community will create with ZMorph’s latest product, the practical and versatile VX multitool 3D printer, with improved hardware and software.

The desktop ZMorph VX is described as a workhorse, using dozens of materials and its three different fabrication methods to solve problems. With laser engraving and CNC milling capabilities, the VX is more than just a 3D printer – users can even combine the three technologies to make innovative products, like speakers, lamps, and drones.

It has a touchscreen panel, a new and improved, fully automated system for calibration, an easy to use workflow switching station, and a new building platform featuring a borosilicate glass plate that can be heated. It also comes with a separate base plate for laser engraving and CNC milling, which can hold objects for processing.

ZMorph CEO Przemek Jaworski with the new machine and an architectural model showing the precision capabilities at TCT Show [Photo: Sarah Goehrke]

The ZMorph VX features a reworked extruder, and offers many great multi-material features, including:

  • Selective two-material 3D printing
  • Color blending
  • Image mapping
  • Printing with PVA soluble supports

ZMorph’s innovative closed loop system (check out this video to hear the company’s founder and CEO Przemek Jaworski explain how it works), high-quality components, and superior aluminum construction all make the new VX multitool 3D printer able to offer high 3D printing speed and stand up under high CNC torque. It has industrial-grade repeatability, and accuracy that’s measured in microns, making it like your very own heavy duty mini factory.

The Voxelizer software has been completely revamped, allowing users to optimize models with 3D filters, create beautiful prints with advanced multi-material algorithms, and use smart support structures to print objects you thought were unprintable. The software has been revised and simplified, able to control laser engraving, CNC milling, and 3D printing. The design of the new software is well-suited to both beginners and experts.

3D printed models showed off the Voxelizer filters at TCT Show [Photo: Sarah Goehrke]

The ZMorph VX can be used with multiple fabrication materials, such as PLA, HIPS, ABS, and TPU for 3D printing; PVC foam, HDPE, copper laminates (for PCBs), and polycarbonate for CNC cutting and engraving; and leather and wood for laser engraving. The laser cutting capability can also handle felt, cardboard, and paper, and you can even extrude thick pastes, like ceramics and chocolate.

Some of the technical specs include:

  • 530 x 555 x 480, with a working area of 250 x 235 x 165 mm (toolhead dependent)
  • Mechanical position precision: 14 microns for X and Y axes, 0.6 microns for Z axis
  • Silent X and Y stepper drivers, which reduce motor noise by 50%
  • 50 – 400 micron layer resolution
  • Maximum 3D printing temperature of 250°C
  • WiFi, USB, and LAN access
  • Standalone printing supported through panel and internal SD card

Keep an eye out for the upcoming ZMorph Catalog, which helps users working on a variety of projects search for things like educational aids.

With all of this innovation comes an increased price, and the cost for the ZMorph VX multitool 3D printer is dependent on the number of additional tools you want. It starts at $2,799 for just the 3D printer itself, and can go up to $4,399, which is the cost for a set of printers, CNC milling machines, paste extruders, and lasers. To see the new ZMorph VX in action, check out the video below:

 [Source/Images: ZMorph]
Discuss this and other 3D printing stories at 3DPrintBoard.com, or share your thoughts in the comments below.

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