ETH Zurich University Spin-off, Additively, Launches to Help Companies in Realizing Their 3D Printing Goals

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Additive manufacturing is changing the world, changing business practices, and saving companies millions of dollars each month around the globe. For some larger companies it’s often easy to integrate 3D printing into additively-2their manufacturing process, however for other companies, it can be an expensive risk.

Based on research conducted at ETH Zurich, a new spin-off has launched called Additively, hoping to conquer the problems that many companies face when trying to bring additive manufacturing into their facilities. Additively sees 3d printing as offering, “great advantages compared to traditional manufacturing methods, especially for the production of parts in small quantities and with high complexity.” The problem is that there are two major obstacles which impede companies from realizing their 3d printing goals. According to Additively they are:

  • Selection of the right 3D printing technology that can fulfill the requirements
  • Finding the right service provider to produce the parts

Additively feels that their service addresses both of these problems. They allow engineers to post specific projects on their platform, and then collect price quotes from any of the 250 service providers who can meet the engineer’s specific goals. Each provider, all located within Europe, have detailed profiles, and are searchable within the directory as well.additively-1

Prof. Dr. Gideon Levy, a scientific adviser to Additively stated the following,

“Today, engineers often wonder if 3D printing could be an option for certain parts. But there is a lot of effort required for this evaluation, e.g. for selecting the right technology, identifying potential service providers and collecting quotations. Therefore, many promising applications are not even evaluated. With Additively.com it is a question of minutes to check if 3D Printing is a valid option.”

The service has just launched and is ready to be put to use.  Discuss this story at the Additively forum thread. If you are a company interested in taking advantage of Additively’s services, check out their webpage.

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