Nano Dimension Receives Grant to Develop Ceramic Inkjet 3D Printing Technology

Share this Article

Nano Dimension logo (PRNewsFoto/Nano Dimension)It seems as though we’ve been anticipating the official release of Nano Dimension’s electronic circuit board 3D printer, the DragonFly 2020, for a long time. The Israeli company announced that they had received a grant to develop the printer towards the end of 2014, and we’ve been following its development ever since then as Nano Dimension works to perfect the groundbreaking machine and release it to the general public. The company has already sent the printer to six beta customers over the course of 2016, and so far we’ve heard nothing but great things from the recipients.

nano_di_dragonfly_2020_3d_printer_500We’ve gotten to see the DragonFly 2020 in person on two separate occasions, and we’ll be seeing Nano Dimension again this week at SOLIDWORKS World 2017. As the conference kicks off, Nano Dimension has some big news about their next project. The company’s innovative work won’t stop after the release of the DragonFly 2020; thanks to a new grant from the Israel Innovation Authority, they’re about to move into a new area of development: 3D printed ceramic components for the aerospace and aviation sectors.

The Israel Innovation Authority’s MEIMAD committee, a joint venture between the Innovation Authority, the Ministry of Finance, and the Administration for the Development of Weapons and Technological Infrastructure of the Ministry of Defense, has approved a budget of NIS 1.4 million (about $372,000) for the project, which will involve the development of inkjet 3D printing technology for advanced ceramic materials. Ceramics are ideal for aerospace components because of their mechanical strength and high thermal resistance, but ceramic parts are expensive and time-consuming to produce, plus they don’t lend themselves to the creation of complex structures with current production methods.

All of that changes when 3D printing is brought into the equation. 3D printed ceramics are fairly new, and ceramic inkjet printing even more so. In November, XJet announced that they had developed a brand new ceramic 3D printing technology based on their pioneering NanoParticle Jetting metal 3D printing technology. The introduction of their ceramic inkjet printing method was big news, as it’s completely different from the typical extrusion-based ceramic printers we’ve seen so far.

3d_mid-3d_printed_object_combining_dielectric_and_conductive_materials

Nano Dimension image of a 3D printed object with both conductive and dielectric materials.

So what will Nano Dimension’s ceramic inkjet process look like? That remains to be seen, of course, but the technology that makes the inkjet-based DragonFly 2020 so effective for electronics has great potential for ceramic materials. The DragonFly’s multimaterial capabilities, speed, and high printing resolution are just a few of the highlights that make the technology ideal for adaptation to ceramics – and, in fact, ceramics can be used as a dielectric material in 3D printed PCBs, further improving them, as the insulation and mechanical strength properties of ceramic are much better than those of the materials currently used in the PCB industry.

The benefits of ceramics go beyond their aforementioned characteristics: they also stand out for their elasticity, plasticity, shear strength, tensile strength, compressive strength, and more, making them ideal for the manufacture of everything from structural and building materials to textiles. It’s not surprising that the aerospace industry has taken such an interest in 3D printed ceramics, and MEIMAD is wise to capitalize on the technology through the expertise of Nano Dimension. The Israel Innovation Authority will be financing 50% of the total budget for the project, with the agreement that Nano Dimension will pay royalties on any future sales of the funded technology.

MEIMAD’s goal is to promote advanced dual-use technologies for military, defense, and commercial research and development purposes, bolstering both national security and financial profit at the same time. Discuss in the Nano Dimension forum at 3DPB.com.

 

 

Share this Article


Recent News

Italy: Studying Properties & Geometry of Scaffold-Like Structures for Tissue Engineering

The State of 3D Printing in Heavy Equipment



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Volvo’s Conservation Project: 3D Printed Tiles for a Living Seawall at Sydney Harbour

Oysters, seaweed, fish, algae and many more organisms have a new home at North Sydney Harbour. At one of the world’s largest Living Seawalls in Bradfield Park, an ocean conservation...

Volvo CE Adopts 3D Printing for Spare Parts and Prototyping

Volvo Construction Equipment (Volvo CE) is one of the largest companies in the construction equipment industry, with more than 14,000 employees worldwide. The company’s values center around sustainability and innovation,...

Metal Additive Manufacturing Helps Renault Trucks Reduce Weight of 4-Cylinder Engine by 25% Using 3D Printed Components

In spring of 2015, 3D artist and designer Bernhard Bauer used Blender to 3D model, from scratch, and 3D print a 1:14 scale Renault delivery truck replica for one of...

Old Meets New in Latest OpenRC Tire Design from Thomas Palm

Leif Tufvesson loves cars. He spent part of his career working as a technician for Volvo’s Research and Development Department in Gothenburg, Sweden, followed by a six-year stint at the...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Services & Data

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!