D3CRYPT3D Software Aims to Provide Security For 3D Assets and Intellectual Property

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One of the biggest hinderances lingering throughout the 3D printing community is the lack of security for intellectual property of 3D models. The glaring issue has plagued users of 3D marketplaces like Thingiverse, and has caused conflict and mistrust for a number of designers and artists. From eBay sellers profiting off of the 3D design work of others to recent accusations of stolen IP between a designer and 3D printing company, the lack of clarity and IP security concerns has promoted a number of law experts and companies to voice their own opinion on the matter.

d3cryptedTo help solve this dilemma, Chloe Kettell, Dosa Kim, and Partha Ray have launched a startup called D3CRYPT3D, which aims to safeguard 3D assets and intellectual property with their newly launched proprietary software. The D3CRYPT3D software is centered around encryption, which ensures that 3D designers will be instantly alerted if any unauthorized parties attempt to access their 3D model or product. When an unauthorized party tries to access the 3D designer’s personalized file, the software will display a calling card that features their contact information, which helps to promote the creator’s work while also preventing unauthorized downloads.

“Given the paradigm shift in business towards a more digitally oriented marketplace, 3D files and assets are an integral part of manufacturing, entertainment and ideation,” says Co-Founder Chloe Kettell. “Currently, there is no available software that protects 3D assets in the public domain. That is a huge problem just begging to be solved!”

multilayered_iconOfficially launched earlier this week, the D3CRYPT3D software platform includes an easy-to-use interface, enabling creators and designers to protect their IP and 3D assets with the click of a button. As the entirety of the design world shifts into the digital space, this software aims to offer security and much-needed peace of mind to these 3D designers. Simply download the software and register an account, and anyone can start encrypting and keeping track of their own files.

According to the D3CRYPT3D team, the main differences between their software and Winzip or 7-Zip is that D3CRYPT3D allows the file type to remain the same and be opened in its native application. Additionally, their proprietary software includes asset tracking metrics embedded in the encryption, which allows for tracking throughout the life cycle of the file. They are currently working on transforming D3CRYPT3D into a web-based application with even more features, including a calling card feature for artist promotion and real-time asset tracking.

The D3CRYPT3D team is also vastly experienced and well-suited to take on this critical task. Co-founder Partha Ray has over 15 years experience in computer forensics, while Dosa Kim has spent over 20 years in the world of 3D and special effects. The third co-founder, Chloe Kettell, is a former Marine and University of Maryland graduate student. According to the forward-thinking trio, all of whom met as neighbors in Los Angeles, the idea for D3CRYPT3D was hatched just six months ago over a bottle of whiskey. Now, the team is working out of an old linen factory in Georgia to bring their product to the forefront of IP and 3D asset security.

Dosa Kim, Chloe Kettell, and Partha Ray

Dosa Kim, Chloe Kettell, and Partha Ray (left to right)

The D3CRYPT3D software is currently in beta, but the first version of the software is set to be released by the start of 2017. They also already have a patent pending for their next version of the software, which they hope to release by end of spring 2017. Though the 3D printing community will certainly benefit from this type of software, D3CRYPT3D has the potential to protect a wide range of 3D design-based industries, from video game developers to special effects producers. Most importantly of all, 3D artists will be able to share their magnificent work with the world without having to worry about their creation being stolen without permission or recognition. Discuss in the D3CRYPT3D forum at 3DPB.com.

 

 

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