Old Meets New in Latest OpenRC Tire Design from Thomas Palm

Share this Article

Leif Tufvesson loves cars. He spent part of his career working as a technician for Volvo’s Research and Development Department in Gothenburg, Sweden, followed by a six-year stint at the also-Sweden-based Koenigsegg. Tufvesson is one of the lucky ones who got to channel his passion into a successful career, but like so many others, he eventually broke away from the corporate world to start his own business doing what he really loves – designing and building his own cars, as well as restoring classic ones.

Hot-rod-jakob_caresto

In 1996, Tufvesson started Caresto. At the time, he was still working for Volvo, but after his years at Koenigsegg, he decided to go full-time with his own business. A quick look at his portfolio is all it takes to know that Tufvesson is talented at what he does. In 2004, he won Hot Rod Magazine‘s “Hot Rod of the Year” award for his Volvo T-6 Roadster, his first “Volvo-rod.” Even more successful, however, was the Hot Rod Jakob, a car he built in 2007 to commemorate Volvo’s 80-year anniversary. Based on the classic Volvo Jakob, the first car ever manufactured by the company, the award-winning hot rod has been featured in numerous magazines since its production. You can see more about the Hot Rot Jakob’s development below:

One thing that sets Tufvesson and other modern car enthusiasts apart from those of the past is a second outlet for their passion. R/C cars have been around for a while, but 3D printing has taken the hobby to an entirely new level, as evidenced by groups such as the OpenRC Project. We’ve been following OpenRC for a long time as it has grown from the personal project of engineer and designer Daniel Norée into a community of thousands of RC and 3D printing hobbyists and fans.

Palmiga-Caresto_F1-4pcs-tiresThe most excitement to come out of the OpenRC Project recently has been the release of Norée’s RC Formula 1 car, a project that had been eagerly awaited by the OpenRC community over the course of the car’s development. Now that it’s been officially released, however, the car is by no means finished – the beauty of open source projects is that they are constantly changing. Mechanical engineer Thomas Palm of Palmiga Innovation has been one of the biggest contributors to the F1, and to OpenRC in general, with his ever-growing variety of 3D printed tire designs. Palm has now teamed up with Tufvesson to create a new set of tires for the F1 – based, naturally, on the Hot Rod Jakob.

Tufvesson’s tires fit on the low profile rims previously developed by Palm. The new design is a great way to honor how automobiles have changed over the years: from a 1927 classic car to a redesigned hot rod to a remote-controlled, 3D printed model, the Volvo Jakob is an example of how a car can continue to exist long after it ceases to be produced in its original form. The files for the new tires can be found here, and Palm states that something big will be coming from Caresto shortly – so stay tuned. Discuss in the 3D Printed Tires forum over at 3DPB.com.

DanielNoree_Palmiga-Caresto

Share this Article


Recent News

Barcelona: Electrostatic Jet Deflection for Ultrafast 3D Printing

University of Waterloo: Cellulosic Nanocomposites in Additive Manufacturing & Electrospinning



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Carbon Fiber Acrylonitrile Styrene Acrylate Composite (CF-ASA): New Material for Large Format Additive Manufacturing

Researchers from Spain are studying materials for more effective large-scale 3D printing, outlining their findings in the recently published ‘Development of carbon fiber acrylonitrile styrene acrylate composite for large format...

Blue Origin Opens Its New Rocket Engine Facility in Alabama

Huntsville, Alabama, is now home to Blue Origin‘s brand new rocket engine production facility,  the latest addition to Huntsville’s Cummings Research Park (CRP), the second-largest research park in the United...

Focus on Improving PLA Mechanical Properties with Addition of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate)

In ‘Improving Mechanical Properties for Extrusion-Based Additive Manufacturing of Poly(Lactic Acid) by Annealing and blending with Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate),’ researchers from Ghent University in Belgium, and Sichuan University in China, explore new...

High-Speed 3D Printing of Flexible Carbon/Silicone Sensors for Medical Wearables

In the recently published ‘Drop-on-demand high-speed 3D printing of flexible milled carbon fiber/silicone composite sensors for wearable biomonitoring devices,’ authors from University of Waterloo  and the University of California, Berkeley...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!