Additive Manufacturing Strategies

Stratasys Partners with Science Centre Singapore to Teach Singaporean Students about 3D Printing

ST Medical Devices

Share this Article

scs_logoMy hometown of Cleveland is home to the Great Lakes Science Center, and it’s one of my favorite local places to go. I went there on field trips when I was in school, and took kids there on field trips when I worked as a camp counselor. I’ve learned a lot about science and technology there, and it’s stuck; everything was presented in such a cool way that it imprinted itself onto my brain immediately, and, moreover, got me excited about it, which was a hard thing to do back when I was younger. I believe every city should have a science center, because they’re invaluable in teaching kids (and adults) in ways that will keep them interested and engaged.

Science Centre Singapore has been around for 37 years, and has been teaching thousands of kids about science, technology, engineering and math since long before the subjects were grouped into the educational conglomerate known as STEM. The center now has an educational unit called STEM Inc, which is dedicated to bringing applied learning in science to schools around Singapore. The unit was set up last January, and now includes a comprehensive 3D printing education program thanks to a new partnership with Stratasys.

singapore

“There has been tremendous progress made in the areas of 3D innovation and 3D printing in recent years,” said Associate Professor Lim Tit Meng, Chief Executive of Science Centre Singapore. “Partnering with industry leader such as Stratasys enables students to gain early access to this new cutting edge technology and to equip themselves with better skills, so as to contribute to the real-world STEM industries in future.”

Stratasys’ Asia Pacific branch has been serious about bringing 3D printing education to the region for some time. They opened a 3D Printing Experience Centre at their Singapore office last year, and earlier this year they ran a pilot program in conjunction with Science Centre Singapore that consisted of two-day 3D printing workshops for students from four schools. The pilot program was so successful that the two organizations are now expanding it to reach as many students as possible through their partnership.

dw-stratasys-151209

Ido Eylon, General Manager at Stratasys South Asia & Pacific, speaks at the Stratasys 3D Printing Experience Centre in Singapore. [Photo: Lisabel Ting, Straits Times]

“The education program provides the opportunity for students to try their hand at it, and for educators to prepare skilled employees for the future, bridging the gap between education and the actual workforce,” said Ido Eylon, General Manager at Stratasys South Asia & Pacific. “Moving forward, we believe the next generation of engineers and designers will be able to unleash even more possibilities in 3D printing as we continue to push the boundaries of this innovative technology.”

science center

[Photo: Straits Times]

The workshops offered earlier this year taught students about the ways 3D printing has impacted every industry, and also took them through the process of designing and printing their own 3D models. The first school to adopt Stratasys’ 3D printing curriculum was Temasek Polytechnic, which holds the distinction of being the first school in Asia Pacific and Japan to offer 3D printing curriculum.

 “Working with Stratasys has enhanced the learning progress of our students greatly as they are more engaged in their engineering studies while they obtain hands-on experience to operate the latest 3D technologies, 3D printing systems and design for additive manufacturing, which are very relevant across industries currently,” said Chee Feng Peng, Lecturer at Temasek Polytechnic.

The relevance of 3D technology doesn’t seem to be decreasing anytime soon, so educational partnerships such as this one are very wise. Most of the children in school currently will likely need to know something about 3D printing once they’re ready to start their careers, so it’s important to get them started early. If that learning process can be made fun and engaging, so much the better.  Discuss this partnership in the Stratasys / Science Center Singapore Forum on 3DPB.com.

 

Share this Article


Recent News

New Self-Healing Plastic for 3D Printing Epitomizes Plastic Conundrum

3D Printing Drone Swarms, Pt 11: AI-Powered Boats



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Nuclear Reactor 3D Printing Method Licensed from ORNL

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been making significant progress in 3D printing parts for use in one of the most volatile and dangerous environments:...

3D Printing Drone Swarms, Part 7: Ground & Sea Logistics

As we discuss in our ongoing 3D Printing Drone Swarms series, additive manufacturing (AM) will play an increasing role in the production of all manner of semi-sentient robots. This has...

3D Printed Oil Tanker Parts Approved after 6 Months of Evaluation Use

The oil and gas markets, along with maritime, are less exploited sectors for the additive manufacturing (AM) industry. However, progress is being made in this regard, with a group of...

The Calm Before the Swarm: Notre Dame Researcher 3D Prints Swarm of Robot Insects

The spread of blueprints for DIY gun manufacture has been one of the most infamous developments in 3D printing’s recent history. But this is, of course, far from the only...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.