King Richard III’s Entire 3D Printed Skeleton Unveiled For Museum Opening

Share this Article

The ability of 3D printers to make near exact replicas of objects have led to a variety of amazing applications, especially for the use within museum exhibits. Over the last several months, we have covered numerous stories rich-4detailing how museums worldwide are utilizing 3D printing technology to make copies of their most valuable pieces. By doing so they are able to oftentimes provide museum attendees the option to interact with the replicas in a whole new way, allowing them to actually touch the objects in some cases. Just like 2D scanners and printers have enabled us to forever preserve written manuscripts, old biblical scripts, and historically written artifacts, 3D scanners and 3D printers are doing the same for practically everything else.

Approximately two years ago, a major find related to the history of England took place. In August of 2012, an archaeological excavation was conducted in Leicester, England using sophisticated radar. The site of excavation was a city council car park which once was where the Grey Friars church had stood. What archaeologists found would tie together several key pieces of 15th century England.

After over 500 years buried, the remains of King Richard III, the last English King to die in battle, were discovered. King Richard III had a storied past, one which ultimately led to his death. Depicted by William Shakespeare as a murderous tyrant of a King, who walked with a hunchback, and was a rather frail young man, the findings confirmed his physical stature, but made new findings about his disabilities. In fact one of the most exciting pieces of his skeleton was that of his spine, showing that rumors of a hunchback were not actually correct.  Instead he had suffered from a severe case of scoliosis (curvature of the spine). We reported on the discovery and subsequent 3D printing of Richard III’s spine in a story back in June.

Actual Bones of Richard III

Actual Bones of Richard III

Today a 3D-printed replica of King Richard III’s remains have been unveiled, a day prior to a new museum called ‘King Richard III: Dynasty, Death and Discovery’ is set to open in Leicester, the same area in which his bones were discovered in. The bones which have been 3D printed out of a white plastic material, will be on display for as many as 100,000 visitors in its first year alone.

The museum, which has over £4 million worth of work put into it, will also feature a facial reconstruction of the King, as well as a history of his rule, and ultimately his death, which left his skeleton riddled with various wounds, some quite grotesque. Visitors to the museum will be able to see, first hand, the damage on certain areas of King Richard III’s skeleton, which includes a slice out of the skulls, an abdominal wound, as well as a pelvic wound similar to one which would have been obtained by a sword shoved through the buttocks.

3D Printed Replicas of the Bones Found

3D Printed Replicas of the Bones Found

As for the King’s actual remains, they will not be on display, and instead are scheduled to be sealed in a tomb at Leicester Cathedral sometime over the next year. Do you plan on visiting this new museum? Let us know what you thought, in the 3D printed King Richard III forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out the video below, previewing the new ‘King Richard III: Dynasty, Death and Discovery’ museum.

Share this Article


Recent News

Swiss Researchers Inspired by Butterfly Wing Structure in 3D Printing Ultra-Lightweight Structures

3D Printing Metamaterials, Part One



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Customized FDM 4D Printing for Metastructures with Variable Bandgap Regions

International researchers are moving to the next level in digital fabrication, publishing their findings in ‘Shape-Adaptive Metastructures with Variable Bandgap Regions by 4D Printing.’ Focusing on how 4D metastructures can...

nTopology and ORNL Partner to Optimize BAAM 3D Printing

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is the epicenter of a great deal of exciting research currently taking place in the 3D printing industry, much of...

TU Delft: 3D Printing Soft Mechanical Materials for Ultra-Programmable Robotics

TU Delft scientists continue to delve into 3D printing research, recently developing advanced robotics in the form of highly programmable—and soft—actuators. Fabricated with both hard and soft materials, the actuators...

China: Origami Used to Strengthen 4D Metamaterials Resulting in a Tunable Miura-ori Tube

Chinese researchers explore not only the inspiration of origami designs and structures in science and technology today, but also the uses of 4D printing in a range of industrial applications....


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!