Edible 3D Printed Treats Made of Crickets and Dung Beetles Are Here!

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Over the last couple of years we have seen countless different objects 3D printed. We have also seen all sorts of materials used to print the objects. From plastics, to titanium, to wood composites, to even sugar and dough. Out of all these, I would have to say that this recent material is probably the most eye opening, and stomach churning.

Crickets and dung beetles are what make up these delectable, highly nutritious treats.  The insects have been crushed into a paste, fed into a 3D printer, and extruded into these intricate, well designed treats. Yes, pretty disgusting, but very nutritious if you ask Susana Soares, of London South Bank University, who feels that, “As the population grows, insects will be a solution to some food problems.”

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Maybe if you drown them in butter or BBQ sauce, and tell people that they are meat snacks, you’ll get some interested parties. Insects, especially crickets, are extremely high in protein. A 100 gram serving of crushed crickets contain a total of just about 121 calories, while providing 12.9 grams of protein, and 49.5 calories from fat. They are a bit high in carbs though, so if you are looking to cut down on your figure, you may want to consider another insect treat.crickets3

Discuss these highly nutritious, and tasty 3D printed treats here: https://3dprintboard.com/showthread.php?1653-3D-Printed-Food-From-Insect-Paste

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