Race Car With Over 360 3D Printed Parts on Display at Chinese Expo

Share this Article

carchin1There are so many benefits to 3D printing within the manufacturing space. It all just depends what you are using the technology for. Within the aerospace industry we repeatedly hear about how 3D printing metal components can cut a tremendous amount of weight, an incredibly important variable within the construction of anything that’s taking flight. Whether it’s NASA, Boeing, Airbus, or the numerous other companies adopting 3D printing for this reason, one thing is clear: lots of money is being saved.

The aerospace industry is not the only area in which weight reduction will lead to cost savings. Take for instance automobiles. The lighter a vehicle is, the less resistance it encounters, meaning it ch3can move faster and use less fuel. 3D printing certainly isn’t foreign to the auto industry. In fact Ford, Fiat Chrysler, Bentley, Rolls Royce, and just about every other auto manufacturer is using the technology in one form or another. There’s even a company called Local Motors that is using it to pretty much print entire vehicles.

3D printing is clearly the future of automotive manufacturing, and Tongji University in Shanghai, China realizes this. This week at the International Technology Import and Export Fair being held at the Shanghai World Expo Exhibition, an incredible vehicle was on display. With over 1,000 companies and universities on hand displaying a variety of innovative technologies, and 30,000 attendees expected, students from Tongji University unveiled a one-seated electric race car which utilized 3D printing almost to an extreme.

The vehicle, which featured over 362 different 3D printed parts, is incredibly light, weighing only about 30% of what a typical race car of this size would weigh. The weight reduction helps to increase speed and acceleration, enables a longer range before the batteries are drained, and has also proved that 3D printing can accomplished the same traditional manufacturing goals, only better. Looking at the vehicle it’s hard to tell that a significant portion of it is printed out. That’s because the majority of the 3D printed components are within its internal structure. In fact even components within the engine are printed from aluminum.

ch1

Although currently many auto manufacturers are only using 3D printing for prototyping, a time is coming, soon enough, when the cars we drive will be lighter and more fuel efficient, and feature end-use components like this vehicle coming out of Tongji University in Shanghai. It’s awesome to see young people around the world pushing this technology forward in a way which certainly has us all excited to see what the future may have in store.

Is this the future of racing and automobile manufacturing?  Let’s hear your thoughts in the 3D Printed Race Car forum thread on 3DPB.com.

carchin3

carchin4

carchin2

ch4

Share this Article


Recent News

MX3D Receives €2.25M to Commercialize Metal 3D Printing Welding Robots

Baubot 3D Printing Robot is a Construction Site’s New Helper



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

COBOD’s 2020 Financial Results Confirm Profitable Growth for Construction 3D Printing

It turns out that 2020 was an excellent year for Danish firm COBOD. The cement 3D printer manufacturer reported a gross profit of DKK 9.3 million ($1.5 million) for 2020...

Featured

NASA Funds 36 Space 3D Printing Projects—Here Are the 15 Most Exciting

NASA’s latest funding of space technology projects includes plenty of 3D printing innovation proposals. Out of a total of 289 US small businesses and 47 research institutions to receive initial...

World’s First 3D Printed Community Starts Development in California

Palari Group and Mighty Buildings have announced what could become the world’s first community of 3D printed homes. The community, which is slated to be zero net energy, will be...

Branch Technology Installs 3D Printed Façade on Local Credit Union

Chattanooga, Tennessee’s Branch Technology has been making steady progress with its unique additive construction technology, including a recent $11 million infusion to expand its fleet of 3D printers. Its latest...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.