Rinkak’s 3D Printed Product Marketplace Expands to the US

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r3The ability to 3D print opens up so many doors to traditional product designers. No longer are their ideas limited to the availability of molds for a particular new product, and no longer is prototyping of these designs a problem. We have seen numerous marketplaces emerge over the last couple of years catering to the huge influx of incredibly intricate, and very clever designs for products ranging from decorations to useful tools.

Although in the US and Europe services like Shapeways are incredibly popular, Asia has been a bit of a different story. Rinkak, the subsidiary of startup Kabuku Inc., has emerged as one of the leaders within the Asian market for 3D printed goods. Based in Japan, the company has been able to capitalize on the locality of their manufacturing facility to cater towards Asia unlike other 3D printing marketplaces out there.r2

Back in October, Rinkak announced that they had partnered with a United States-based factory to seek an expansion of their services. Here we are a few months later, and the effort in doing so has finally paid off. Today Rinkak has announced their US arrival.

“Now, designers can sell their 3D printed products not only in the U.S. but also in Asia on Rinkak,” explained Masahiko Adachi, of Rinkak to 3DPrint.com. “To celebrate our opening, we pleased to offer 30% OFF coupon and FREE shipping cost as a monthly campaign.”

Registration to the new US platform is entirely free. Users can simply upload their 3D models, set their product’s price, and Rinkak will do everything else for them, using their rapid quotation system to help designers begin to sell their products. Rinkak can also be used to create prototypes of a product, by making the design private and secure, and unable to be accessed by others on the platform.

Because of Rinkak’s global partnerships with manufacturers, designers are now able to market their products to both Asia and the US, and buyers are able to receive their orders quickly, as they are printed within a facility that is closer to them. By opening their platform up to more of a global audience, both designers (sellers) and buyers should benefit substantially.

Those within the US who would like to take advantage of the 30% off coupon, in addition to free shipping, may use coupon code [RINKAK-US]. Let us know if you are in the US, have registered on the new platform, and what your thoughts are. Discuss in the Rinkak forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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