Dutch Student Creates Incredible Iron Man Arc Reactor on His 3D Printer

Share this Article

arcfeaturedWe have seen a lot of individuals use 3D printing in the creation of costumes and props. Whether it is a Halloween costume or a more elaborate ‘cosplay’ type design, 3D printing provides a method of complete customization. However, while 3D printing is very successful in creating costumes, if a designer wishes to add a more interactive aspect, it will require a bit more technology than what is provided via 3D printing. For example, what if you want an Iron Man Arc Reactor?

For one Dutch student, named Timo Maluche, this is exactly the idea that popped into his head one evening.

“After I printed a lot of test pieces and cubes on my printer, I thought it was finally time for a real project,” Maluche tells 3DPrint.com. “It just so happened that Iron Man 2 was on the television that night. Me being a massive Iron Man fan, I just had to watch it. Once I saw the gift Pepper Potts made for Tony Stark (The ‘Proof that Tony Stark has a Heart’ box) I just knew that had to be my first project.”

arc2So, Maluche set out to create a 3D printed Arc Reactor. To better prepare himself for designing it, he went out and purchased a DVD copy of Iron Man 2, and watched the particular scene mentioned above, over and over again. He even went so far as to watch it frame by frame so that he could see all of the details of the device. At the same time, he was also sure to compare the size of the Arc Reactor to the hands of Pepper Potts, so that he could get an idea of approximately how large it really was.

Maluche then used Autodesk Inventor 2014 to design all of the 3D parts, before printing them out on his CartesioM 3D printer. This wasn’t enough for Maluche, however. He wanted to make it look as realistic as possible, and this meant adding some sort of light source to his newly 3D printed prop.

arc4“My first design had no place for LEDs but I thought it would be a lot cooler if it really lit up, so I managed to make [space] for 30 LEDs and a 9 volt battery block,” Maluche tells us. “The electronics are really simple. I just put the LEDs in the holes I made, connected a resistor to every LED and soldered them in a parallel circuit.”

Maluche also used glow-in-the-dark filament for the white sections of the reactor so that when dark out, it keeps its glow. All in all, it took a full week to design, 3D print, solder, and assemble. Not bad for someone who had just recently got his first 3D printer. Maluche is currently a student in the Netherlands, where he is studying precision engineering. He is in his 3rd year of studies, and became interested in 3D printing when he took part in an internship at Mauk.cc. ” I got my first printer there and since then I got addicted to 3D printing,” he explained.

arc5

Maluche’s Arc Reator is currently being used as a night light on his bedside table. He hopes to release the files for free download in the near future, once he has had time to clean them up a little bit.

What do you think about this 3D printed Iron Man Arc Reactor? Discuss in the 3D Printed Arc Reator forum thread on 3DPB.com.

arc1

Share this Article


Recent News

Blueprint Launches Technology Enablement Program—Brings Greater Knowledge to 3D Printing Users

MIT: A New Fiber Ink With Electronics Embedded Inside



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

TU Delft Researchers Create Soft Robotics that Respond to Color-Based Sensors

As 3D printing and robotics continue to collide and complement each other, new machines are being created. In soft robotics, we’re seeing the emergence of a class of machines that...

MIT: Automated System Designs and 3D Prints Optimized Actuators and Displays to Spec

Actuators are complex devices that mechanically control robotic systems in response to electrical signals received. Depending on the specific application they’re used for, today’s robotic actuators have to be optimized...

Using Casting, Graphene, and SLM 3D Printing to Create Bioinspired Cilia Sensors

  What Mother Nature has already created, we humans are bound to try and recreate; case in point: biological sensors. Thanks to good old biomimicry, researchers have made their own...

Nanyang Technological University: Inkjet Printing of ZnO Micro-Sized Thin Films

In ‘Inkjet-printed ZnO thin film semiconductor for additive manufacturing of electronic devices,’ thesis student Van Thai Tran, from Nanyang Technological University, delves into the realm of fabricating products with conductive...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Print Services

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!