AMS Spring 2023

Couple Uses 3D Printing, Biomechanics, and Ergonomics to Design Innovative New Coffee Mug

6K SmarTech

Share this Article

I have far more coffee mugs than any sane person in the world should reasonably own. I recently had to get rid of a couple because I received three more for Christmas – two literary mugs and a black one with the letter ‘S’ emblazoned on it in white. I have Harry Potter mugs, a mug from college, one that my grandmother gave me for Christmas several years ago, a full set of mugs that matches our dishware…and that’s all without listing our multiple travel mugs of varying sizes. It’s a good thing I like coffee, otherwise that would be a lot of wasted room in my cupboards.

However, what I do not have is a coffee mug that is 3D printed, or one that takes ergonomics into consideration. The tried and true design for the coffee mug has been mostly unchanged for almost 5,000 years…until now. You may think I’m being needlessly dramatic when I say that, but for a cup that many people have come to revere as an additional limb, I think this is a big deal.

Typical coffee mugs create stress on the joints, ligaments, and tendons of a person’s forearm, hand, and wrist, and can easily burn you. Married couple Allen and Diana Arseneau – one a biochemical engineer and one a scientist – noticed how uncomfortable coffee mugs actually are, and vowed to change things. Over the course of two and a half years, the couple used the principles of 3D printing and bioengineering to change up how coffee mugs are designed, combining ergonomics, science, and biomechanics to develop the patented Jamber Mug.

“We are a husband-and-wife team trying to improve the quality of life for people around the globe,” the Arseneaus wrote on the Jamber website.

“We do this using a human-centric data-driven design approach to reinventing everyday consumer products.”

Turning to extensive data analysis and receiving assistance from an advisory team of industry experts, the Arseneaus, who reside in Massachusetts with their two children, purchased a 3D printer and got to work on designing their new and improved mug, analyzing the anatomy of the human hand, typical coffee mug handles, and grip strength. The result is the Jamber Mug, which is less strenuous on your joints and therefore very comfortable to hold, thanks to its innovative handle.

This handle puts a person’s hand in a more restful, anatomically neutral position, which lowers joint stress, while also easily keeping it in an efficient, strong power grip. In addition, a stabilizing foot nub located at the base of the Jamber Mug’s handle adds some extra stability, which reduces accidental and potentially painful spills when you’re pulling your hand away.

The Jamber Mug is a really great concept for people suffering from arthritis, carpal tunnel, tendonitis, Parkinson’s, and thumb and hand injuries, since it’s so much easier to hold, and the mug is attractive as well. Each one is made out of industrial-grade ceramic in the US, and they’re also safe to use in both the microwave and the dishwasher.

The mug, made with 3D printing, is available in both a 12 oz. and 16 oz. size, and while it weighs the same as a traditional coffee mug, it feels much more lightweight since it’s so easy to hold. A set of two mugs is just $12.50, while the gift set of four Confetti mugs is $49.95. For US customers, shipping is free for orders of four mugs or more.

Available designs include Lemon Zest Solid, Ruby Red, Admiral, and Moroccan Blue Sweep and Incline, Dove White, and the special Vivian Mug (#BeatCancer), which was made especially for a customer’s daughter, who is battling Stage 4 High-Risk Neuroblastoma. $2 from the sale of each Vivian Mug goes directly to her family.

What do you think of the Jamber Mug? Discuss this story and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

[Images: Jamber]

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing News Unpeeled: Wipro Launches a 3D Printer, Liux Wants to Make more Sustainable Cars

Hypersonic Engine with 3D Printed Parts Achieves Key Milestone in Hypersonic Flight



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing News Unpeeled: NASA Recycles Packaging and Wants 3D Printed Shuttle Tiles

NASA has given an SBIR award to Gigabot to develop an in space packaging reycling and printing system. Meanwhile Canopy gets another award to make a binder jet production technology...

3D Printing Financials: voxeljet Q3 Earnings Results Miss on Revenue, Net Loss Widens

Pioneering 3D printer manufacturer voxeljet (NASDAQ: VJET) reported its latest round of earnings last week, missing on revenue and earning expectations. The German company’s revenue was €5.7 million for the...

MolyWorks’ Recycled 3D Printing Metals Business Gets $36M Infusion

Continuum, the sustainable metal recycling arm of California 3D printing startup MolyWorks, has raised $36 million in a private equity funding round to support the rapid advancement of the circular...

Formnext 2022, Day Three: Fleet Footed

My feet feel like they’ve been put in a blender and then repeatedly slammed by a door. How did humans cope with standing so much before we invented desks? I...