GE is Giving Away Twelve 3D Printed Jet Engines…. or you can Print Your own Today!

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General Electric has been known as one of the larger corporations in the world that currently uses 3D printing in the creation of not just prototypes, but of final products as well. They have used different forms of additive manufacturing in the production of airplane jet engines, as well as parts for a variety of other products.

The type of 3D printing (additive manufacturing) that the company seems to use the most is DMLM (Direct Metal Laser Melting), where a machine gradually melts a metal powder to create 3-dimensional objects. GE Aviation is provide with the metal powder in large quantities of 15 and 30 pound bags. They have been using this technology for many different aspects within the production of jet engine components.

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Wouldn’t we all like to own a 3D printed jet engine? Well now is your chance. GE Aviation is holding a sweepstakes contest, called “Build Your Own Jet Engine“, in order to give away 12 3D printed jet engines. Okay, hold it there….. They aren’t real jet engines, but instead plastic 3D printed replicas. Nevertheless, they are still super cool, and would look great on anyone’s desk, mantel, or coffee table.

All in all, 12 winners will be selected, all of whom will receive one of these unique 3D printed jet engine replicas. The contest runs from today (July 11th) through July 21st at 4:00 p.m. or whenever 12 winners have been confirmed. Complete rules and details can be found at the contest website.

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If you don’t win, there is no reason for concern. You can still download the design files for this jet engine on Thingiverse. If you decide to print your own, the design comes in 13 separate 3D printable pieces, which must then all be assembled.  The detailed assembly instructions can be found here.

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What do you think? Have you entered the contest? Will you be downloading the design and printing it out yourself? We’d love to see your results. Discuss in the Build Your Own Jet Engine forum thread on 3DPB.com

The individual pieces that must be assembled after printing at home.

The individual pieces that must be assembled after printing at home.

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