College Student 3D Prints the Scariest Mask Ever… of Himself!

Inkbit

Share this Article

orsburn33D printing has been lending itself to the creation of all sorts of interesting costumes, masks, and accessories as of late. The ability to completely design a costume from the ground up has attracted many artists, designers, and creative minds into entering the realm of 3D printed fashion and cosplay.

We have seen masks created, intending to replicate characters from movies, TV shows, and video games, as well as completely unique pieces which have not been seen before. For one student at the University of Texas at Austin, named Joshua Orsburn, 3D printing allowed him to create one of the scariest masks we have ever seen — a mask of his own face. Not that his face is scary by any means, but the artistic methods he used created something so frightening that even a zombie would go running for the hills if it encountered someone wearing his creation.

“My general focus is usually more traditional print-making such as lithography, but I couldn’t leave school without giving 3D printing a chance,” Orsburn tells 3DPrint.com. “In my 3D fabrications course we were given an assignment to create an extension to the human body. My work usually revolves around the dichotomy of people’s personalities and thus chose to physically manifest these emotions into a singular mask.”

orsburn2

In order to fabricate the mask, Orsburn took several color scans of his own face and then used Rhino3D to “boolean the meshes” together. This allowed him to create a model which featured several different scans of his face onto the same mask.

“From there I scrapped the realistic color data and assigned an arbitrary flesh like uniform tone to it,” Orsburn tells us.

It was then off to 3D printing his creation. It took approximately 11 hours to print, using a gypsum (sandstone) 3D printer. Because prints that come off a gypsum-based 3D printer are very fragile, Orsburn finished it by adding acrylic paint and graphite, before dipping it in resin, to provide strength and a shiny finish.

orsburn

As you can see, the final product is fascinating as well as quite scary — whether this was Orsburn’s intention or not. Regardless though, the job that he put forth was certainly an incredible one, and surely his professor was quite pleased with the work as well.

What do you think of Orsburn’s mask? Is this not the scariest thing you’ve ever seen? Discuss in the 3D Printed Mask of One’s Self forum thread on 3DPB.com.

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing News Briefs, May 28, 2022: Metal 3D Printer, Machine Learning, & More

Digital Supply Chains and 3D Printing Come to Alaska via Ivaldi



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing News Briefs, May 26, 2022: Filaments & Ink, Cultural Artifacts, & More

In 3D Printing News Briefs today, we’ll be sharing some material news, followed by a new 3D printing-focused product line, and finally onto cultural heritage. First, Braskem has released three...

New 3D Printing Hardware, Collaborations & More at RAPID+TCT 2022

This year, the RAPID + TCT conference kicked off Tuesday with new products, materials, and solutions, many of them on display at the event. 2022 is the 31st year for...

Featured

Shell 3D Prints Impellers for Its Dutch Refinery

The oil and gas industry hasn’t adopted additive manufacturing (AM) techniques to the same extent as some other large-scale industries, like the aerospace and automotive sectors. Nonetheless, oil and gas...

Featured

The Digital Textile Tech Behind Kornit’s Sustainable Fashion

I recently traveled to Israel to attend Kornit Fashion Week Tel Aviv 2022 and see Kornit Digital (NASDAQ: KRNT) introduce its Atlas MAX Poly and Apollo solutions for digital, sustainable fashion. The...