Airwolf 3D Announces Wolfbite Premium Heatbed Adhesion Solution for ABS

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air1There’s no doubt that 3D printers with large build volumes are generally preferred over the smaller machines. After all, who wouldn’t want the option to print objects as large as their heart desires? With that said, there is one issue that many individuals new to 3D printing usually do not realize until they start using these larger machines. Especially when printing with Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) thermoplastic, larger items tend to warp, causing them to pop up from the print bed they were once stuck to. Such a problem will usually result in a catastrophic end to your print project, or at best, not the print you were hoping for.

There are several methods to help prevent such catastrophe from taking place; however, none of them work 100% of the time, and many leave the object stuck so well to the platform once printed, that oftentimes the object, or the build plate, is damaged during removal.

Costa Mesa, California-based Airwolf 3D is trying to solve both of these rather common issues. Airwolf 3D, the manufacturers of several FFF-based 3D printers, featuring above average build volumes, knows all too well the problems their users can face when dealing with ABS. This has led the team to create a new product called Wolfbite.

The new premium solution, which has been specifically engineered to bond ABS plastic parts to a heated 3D printer build platform, preventing lifting, and allowing for easy removal once cooled, was announced at the Inside 3D Printing air3Conference & Expo in Santa Clara, California, and is being demonstrated there to attendees.

“As manufacturers of 3D printers that are capable of printing large parts in ABS we are aware of the frustrations that warpage and sticking present,” said Erick Wolf, founder and chairman of Airwolf 3D. “After months of research and development, we’re pleased to be able to offer an industry-changing solution that will benefit all 3D printer users.”

Wolfbite comes in a two fluid ounce container with a foam applicator and is available on the Airwolf 3D website for just $19.99 (introductory price). To use, simply dip the applicator into the Wolfbite bottle and gently apply it to the entire build platform. Printing can begin immediately, and the coating should last for several prints.

“Wolfbite is for anyone who is 3D printing in ABS,” said Mark Mathews, Airwolf 3D’s president. “It’s easy to apply, low odor, and long-lasting. Users will see a notable difference in the output of their 3D printed projects when using Wolfbite.”

This proprietary product could certainly help put individuals; and companis’ minds at ease when dealing with large-volume ABS printed projects. It will be interesting to hear some of the reviews from users once Wolfbite begins shipping. Have you used this new product? Let us know your thoughts in the Airwolf Wolfbite forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out the video (Coming soon) to see how easy this solution is to use, and watch as the prints slide right off the platform when cooled, leaving a smoothing finish on the bottom of each printed object.

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