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Imagine a time in the not too distant future when the interior design of homes and offices can be almost entirely customized thanks to 3D printing. We have already seen a company in China 3D print an entire mansion, but what about the stuff that goes inside the mansion? Furniture, decorations, and art can already be 3D printed as well, it’s just that it’s not exactly economical quite yet. As the technology progresses, however, prices will come down, and a world of complete customization will slowly emerge.

We have seen numerous furniture pieces fabricated via large-scale 3D printers. We’ve seen lounge chairs, coffee tables, desks, and all sorts of other decorations for the home. One piece which really opened our eyes to the intricacies and architecture that’s made possible by 3D printing is one by industrial designer Onur Ozkaya.

Ozkaya, who has an extensive background in furniture design, is a lecturer at London Metropolitan University (The CASS) and Cambridge School of Arts. Based in London, Ozkaya decided to use his skill set and understanding of complex geometric patterns and manufacturing techniques to 3D print a coffee table that he calls the ‘Cellular Coffee Table‘.

“Cellular Coffee Table has been developed using three different layers of cellular structural body to provide both lightweight and strong furniture type,” explained Ozkaya to 3DPrint.com. “Each layer has a different thickness ratio in order to save material waste and finally aiming to create a much more exciting spatial environment by providing different shadow qualities at different times of the day.”

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Looking at the table, it becomes apparent just how much thought went into its design, a design which enables a sturdy, yet extremely lightweight frame to come about. The geometries, which transfer weight in just the correct manner, also act as a visually stimulating piece of artwork. With an inner dark grey frame mimicked closely with an outer, larger gold frame, it almost appears as if a shadow of the outer frame is being cast within the table.

“Each cellular layer also include[s] three different spherical corners to support both visual and structural performance of the final piece by providing a simple detailing for the corner conditions,” explained Ozkaya.

The frame of the table is 3D printed with a nylon material, using a laser sintering process and is able to easily support the glass top which is the only portion not printed out. The frame of the table, which Ozkaya believes would fit into both residential and office spaces, measures only 300 x 300 x 350 mm itself, but with the glass top appears much larger.  Total print time according to Ozkaya was approximately 48 hours.

Would you put this table in your home or office? What are your thoughts on Ozkaya’s work? Discuss in the 3D Printed Cellular Table forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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