StrandBeests: 3D Print Crazy Live Animals… Well Almost

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While browsing Shapeways this afternoon I stumbled upon something that caught my eye.  No, it’s not another life saving device that has been 3D printed, or even something that you can get any real use out of, but I still could not look away.  What are these 3D Printed objects you may ask?  They’re Strandbeests, and they have been created by an extremely talented fellow by the name of Theo Jansen.

Theo is a 65 year old Dutch artist with quite the imagination, who gained fame for his  work with PVC piping in the 1990’s to create what were also known back then as StrandBeests.  They were basically large structures that theocould move on their own, many resembling animals or insects.  Because of the fact that they have several leg-like extremities, they also usually have the ability to move on sand better than wheels can.  Unlike a wheel, only small portions of the “Animals” need to touch the ground.   Many Strandbeests can move on their own with the help of a wind driven propeller.   The work was quite an engineering as well as artistic feat.  

Theo has recently decided to take those same skills and apply them to 3D modelling and printing, bringing his creations to Shapeways so that anyone around the world can buy his famous StrandBeests.  He has produced the following video, somewhat humorous, showing off his new 3D printed Beests, comparing them to wild animals:

Currently he is offering four different Strandbeests on Shpaeways,  they include the following:

  • Animaris Geneticus Gracilis
  • Animaris Geneticus Larva
  • Animaris Geneticus Ondularis
  • Animaris Geneticus Parvus

Prices for his little works of art range anywhere from $39 to $110, and make amazing coffee table toys.  You can discuss these little creatures in the 3DPrintBoard Forum here: https://3dprintboard.com/showthread.php?1518-Introducing-Theo-Jansen-s-StrandBeests

strandbeest

 

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