AMS Spring 2023

Graphene 3D Labs (OTCQB:GPHBF) Begins Trading on OTCQB Marketplace Today

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g1For investors, one of the hottest areas within the market over the last three years has been the 3D printing space. Many stocks, including both the giants within the industry, as well as some of the smaller companies, have seen their stocks double or triple within this time frame. Although many of the 3D printing stocks are well off of their highs that they saw at the start of the year, there is plenty of room for additional growth over the next few years as the market is expected to see compound annual growth rates between 20% and 35%.

There are dozens of 3D printing stock plays out there, and a decent handful of pure plays as well. One such company which has received quite a bit of buzz as of late is Graphene 3D Labs Inc. The buzz, likely from the fact that this company is involved in two of the most promising areas in tech, 3D printing, and graphene, has propelled their market cap to over $35 million.

Up until today, shares of Graphene 3D Labs were traded on the TSX Venture Exchange only, which is based in Canada. This has made it a bit more difficult for U.S. investors, wanting to invest in this relatively new company, to do so. Last night the g2company announced that starting today their shares (OTCQB:GPHBF) will be traded on the OTCQB, a marketplace typically reserved for shell companies, penny stocks and small foreign issuers.  The OTCQB is considered to be in the middle tier of over-the-counter marketplaces.

“As a U.S. based company, trading on the OTCQB is a natural step in the growth of Graphene 3D,” stated Daniel Stolyarov, CEO of Graphene 3D Lab Inc. “Graphene 3D is at a pivotal stage in its development, and with the assistance of Euro Pacific Capital we look forward to increasing awareness of the company to a broader U.S. shareholder base. We believe that Euro Pacific’s ability to broaden the company’s access to both current and prospective U.S. shareholders will be key to our continued growth. We also believe that all shareholders will benefit from Euro Pacific’s access to a larger number of retail and institutional investors.”

Graphene 3D Labs is currently researching the development of graphene nanocomposite based 3D printer filaments. They are a spinout of Graphene Laboratories Inc., which is an internationally recognized brand with clients such as Apple, NASA, Honda, GE and Xerox. Led by CEO Dr. Daniel Stolyarov, who holds a PhD in Physical Chemistry, the company hopes to develop methods of printing multi-faceted devices utilizing the ‘wonder’ material, graphene as one of the source materials.

Are you an investor in Graphene 3D Labs? What do you think of this news? Discuss the company and their strategies in the Graphene 3D Labs OTCQB forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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